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A Tooth Diagram Activity For Homeschool Science That Will Make You Smile

Here is a tooth diagram activity for homeschool science that will make you smile! There probably aren’t two people who love smiles more than a dentist… and a teacher! As homeschool parents, we envision ourselves leading our children into learning with bright smiles on all our faces. 

Enjoying learning is as important as reaching your learning objective or picking the perfect read-aloud. We want kids to come to learning with a happy curiosity. We want them to leave with a smile of satisfaction. 

Some learning practices are tailor-made to create enjoyable moments of learning. Using chalk pastels has always worked to perk up my children from the doldrums of copywork or chores. 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Hands-On Homeschool Anatomy

Perhaps you’ve heard learning sticks better when multiple senses are involved.

If kids listen to a lecture, they activate their hearing sense only.

If they read a PowerPoint or watch a video while listening, now they’ve involved their sight as well.

If they listen, read, and recite, that’s three senses! And three more chances for the learning to get in!

But don’t forget the most tactile sense of all – using our hands to move, shape, and create as we learn! Adding this fourth layer of sensory exploration to the learning time engages nearly the whole body, as kids get to select colors, sketch lines, and really engage fully with the concepts in front of them. 

Hands-on learning moves children from passively accepting information to active inquiry as they explore with their fingers, eyes, and ears!

When it comes to learning about anatomy, using your hands to create is a fantastic way to show kids how their body is at work for them! Isn’t it great that we actual have a living specimen to study anatomy with: our own bodies! 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Online Tooth Diagram Activity For Your Homeschool

Studying the teeth is an important topic to include in an anatomy lesson. For one, they are a prominent body feature. Also, kids have all kinds of experiences with teeth: smiling, eating, talking, brushing, and… visiting the dentist! Or even getting a visit from the Tooth Fairy!

But, have your kids ever explored the inner world of the tooth? Most kids view of teeth is a simple white molar shape. Below the surface, teeth have so much more going on. You will find that out with Nana’s tooth diagram activity!

online video art lessons

Nana’s chalk pastel video art lesson of the Diagram of a Tooth highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. 

Kids will love tracing the outline of the tooth first, because it activates prior knowledge. Everyone knows what a tooth looks like on the outside. 

Then Nana goes deeper to show students all the layers: pellicle, enamel, dentin, pulp, cementum. As students draw each layer in different colors, it is interesting to see how Nana adds texture to help them visualize each part. Plus they can start to see the relative thickness and size of each layer as well. 

homeschool science lessons
homeschool art lessons for all ages
Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Soon, kids will have drawn a rainbow diagram of the tooth. Then, like the budding scientists they are becoming, they will label each part. This is a wonderful opportunity to add some vocabulary to their word banks, spelling lists, or handwriting worksheets!

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!
Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

When we completed this lesson, our young exchange student from Spain was staying with us. He enjoyed learning all kinds of new English vocabulary as well as understanding more about tooth anatomy. It just goes to show you how accessible Nana’s chalk pastel lessons are, when even an English language learner can easily enjoy them!

Finally, like any good artist, they can name, sign, and date their work of art: the human tooth! This is sure to be a stunning addition to any bulletin board or art journal. They will barely realize they have tucked away a lot of science and anatomy knowledge, because the journey of painting with chalk pastels is so enjoyable. 

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Additional Resources For Homeschool Science

Don’t stop with the tooth! Nana has a host of homeschool science resources to keep the learning going. When you have a You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership, all of these lessons and the I Drew It Then I Knew It series are at your fingertips all year!

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Homeschool Anatomy & Biology

Homeschool Chemistry & Physics

Homeschool Astronomy

Homeschool Botany

Nana’s video art lesson is a tooth diagram activity that highlights the many-colored wonder of these curious cuspids. Great homeschool science!

Whatever your budding scientist wants to discover, there’s sure to be an exciting and colorful chalk pastel lesson to make your homeschool hands-on when it comes to science! Make the learning fun and the learning will stick – and everyone walks away smiling!

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The Ultimate Guide to Medieval History Lessons For Your Homeschool

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

Medieval History Lessons In Your Homeschool

Why is medieval history so fascinating for children? Maybe it’s the long-ago aspect. Perhaps it’s the excitement of castles, knights, and dragons. Or maybe it’s the idea of character and chivalry embedded in well-known and loved stories passed down through the centuries. 

So much of our make-believe play, legends, and lore come from the medieval time period, making it a fascinating one to study.

While medieval alchemy isn’t real, the opportunities to turn this historical time period into “learning gold” are absolutely available to you as a homeschool parent! Grab yourself a good booklist, a toy sword, and your chalk pastels, and dive in.

Medieval History Homeschool Lessons Your Family Will Love

I always like to start our learning with literature. Stories are a gentle way to introduce time periods, people, and events. 

Begin your medieval history art lessons with a read through well-loved tales of this time period: Robin Hood, William Tell, King Arthur, fairy tales, and other classic books are all great options. 

Then, you can draw some of these literary characters and scenes and unfold the true history of the Middle Ages for your kids.

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

Robin Hood

Robin Hood is a book beloved by children and adults. We love this action-packed adventure and rooting for the underdog. Plus the story provides and excellent conversational jumping off point to talk about historical accuracy and ethical behaviors. 

Read a children’s version of this classic tale and then join Nana to draw Robin Hood in his classic green outfit with his ever-present bow and arrow! 

You can even use the Court Dress lesson to create a Maid Marian for this literature-based art lesson. 

Robin Hood homeschool lessons

Medieval Castles

Monarchies were the government of the era, so a foray into court life is definitely in order! 

Study architecture by painting a medieval castle and discussing how buildings have evolved over time. 

Cathedrals and Stained Glass

As architecture advanced during the Middle Ages, buildings became more elaborate. The church was the center of life and power for most countries in Europe, and their cathedral buildings demonstrated their importance and influence. A fascinating book to read alongside this art lesson is David MaCauley’s Cathedral

Painting stained glass windows with Nana is a colorful lesson everyone will enjoy creating and hanging on the wall. 

Illuminated Letter

Take a short detour to talk about the evolution of printed books and materials. Illuminated manuscripts are both beautiful and an important part of history! Kids can imagine how reading and learning would have been different during a time when every piece of written material was elaborately created by hand. Make the connection between the cathedral lesson and church life, and the work of monks and priests to create and preserve written materials. The Illuminated Letter video art lesson can be a jumpstart to having kids illuminate their own initials and more!

Medieval Times Homeschool Art with Chalk Pastels
Immerse yourself in even MORE history with Erin Vincent’s Medieval Times Homeschool Art with Chalk Pastels

Knights, and lords, and ladies, oh my! 

Paint each of these important peoples of medieval court life and learn more about clothing, court dress, social status, and life at court.

Of course, no one is more important than the King, so be sure to take time for the Crown drawing lesson!

Court Life: Lutes, Jesters, Gardens, and Banquets

Since courtesans spent months or years at the King’s castle, entertainment was important. Lute players and jesters often entertained the wealthy lords and ladies. 

My boys love telling jokes, juggling, and in general being silly, so the Jester art lesson was the first one they wanted to draw when we started talking about medieval times! My oldest even customized his with a fancy mustache!

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

For leisure, you might walk through a medieval garden, and you could pick a bouquet to send a message to a friend or someone you liked—flowers in Medieval times held meanings of great significance, so be sure you pick the right blossoms!

A King or a Lord would often showcase their wealth by hosting extensive feasts at Banquet tables loaded with exquisite foods. Kids can learn and discuss how social status was indicated by where you were seated!

Festival Tent

If you lived in the country, you might attend a festival for your town or in the King’s honor. Festival tents would pop up for these events. You might even find Renaissance Fairs in your area that replicate these events to go along with your festival tent chalk pastel art lesson on this time period. 

festival tent

Falconer-Hawk

Sports started to become important during this time, and hunting was both practical and an exciting pastime. Falconry is a fascinating medieval sport to study and draw with Nana’s Falconer-Hawk lesson.

Dragons

Of course, where there are castles and knights, there be dragons, right? Nana’s colorful dragon art lesson is a fun and fantastical study. 

What is so great about all Nana’s chalk pastel art lessons is that although she always recommends great color combos, she encourages kids to be creative and self-select colors that appeal to them. So we ended up with a green dragon and a red one, too! I love that each of my boys got to show their personalities with this lesson!

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!
Use these medieval history lessons to give a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

Crusade Banner

Besides fighting dragons, knights often traveled on Crusades. This simple lesson can illustrate how people identified their family through heraldry and other symbols.

The Knights Templar lesson is a great companion for the Crusade Banner as well.

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

Weapons of the Middle Ages: Shield, Sword, Catapult

Pick your weapons wisely! If you are a knight in hand-to-hand combat, a sword and shield are essential. Of course the most famous sword is Excalibur, pulled from the stone. Be sure to read this story to your kids as well before or after you paint the famous sword in the stone! 

knights and crusaders

Armies often used large war machines like catapults to besiege castles and towns. After drawing a catapult with Nana, you can create your own catapult with popsicle sticks and cotton balls!

Famous People and Events

In addition to famous stories and fictional characters, medieval history contains true life people and events that kids can learn and draw. Joan of Arc is a strong female figure from this time period. The War of the Roses (remember how important those flowers were!?) art lesson explores England’s own time of civil war between rival royal families. 

Viking Life

Sometimes we limit our medieval studies to England, because so many wars, peoples and events are well-recorded from that area. But the medieval histories of northern Europe is fascinating as well! Viking life and exploration can be an entire unit study of its own. 

Draw a Viking ship and study their seafaring way of conquering and exploring new worlds.

Then draw a Viking helmet and discuss the differences between Viking warriors and knights. Comparing and contrasting civilizations creates the opportunity for deeper learning and discovery. 

viking ship art lesson

Additional Resources For Studying History In Your Homeschool

I’m sure you will find you simply have more and more questions as you study this time period. And that is exactly how true learning happens: one question leads to another, and your kids will be drawn into learning without even realizing it, because they will be so curious and fascinated by this historical time period.

For extra literature and art study, I created a Medieval to Modern Classical Morning Menu for homeschool morning time. Each month features two poems and a Picture Study work of art to study and learn more about this time period. Get a free sample here! 

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

The I Drew It Then I Knew It Medieval History art lessons in You ARE an ARTiST Clubhouse membership come with a companion I Drew It Then I Knew It Guide that will help you pull together all these lessons for your kids. You will find: 

  • Calendar planners
  • Biographies
  • Book Lists
  • Fact Sheets
  • Plus Lesson Overviews

Once you see how art can help you explore all the aspects of history, you will want to study history through art all the time!

Good news! You can, because the You ARE an Artist Clubhouse Membership offers you ALL the 700+ lessons taught by Nana. In addition to this long lineup of medieval history lessons, you can study:

Each of these has an I Drew It Then I Knew It Clubhouse collection of lessons with companion workbooks. You can access all these lessons all year with your Clubhouse Membership

Homeschool Fine arts and music appreciation program for grade six has it covered. Leonardo, Raphael, Botticelli, Michelangelo, and more are all planned out for you to view and discuss with your whole family. Do you want to listen to a little Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Mozart, and a few more composers during your school year? The homeschool plan is all outlined for you. You will have the freedom and flexibility to use You ARE an ARTiST Homeschool Fine Arts for your whole family and at a pace that suits your lifestyle.

Medieval and Renaissance Homeschool Fine Arts

Leonardo, Raphael, Botticelli, Michelangelo, and more are all planned out for you to view and discuss with your whole family. Do you want to listen to a little Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Mozart, and a few more composers during your school year? The homeschool plan is all outlined for you. You will have the freedom and flexibility to use You ARE an ARTiST Homeschool Fine Arts for your whole family and at a pace that suits your lifestyle. Homeschool Fine arts and music appreciation program for grade six has it covered.

Even better – You ARE an ARTiST Clubhouse members get 50% off all Homeschool Fine Arts titles!

Use these medieval history lessons as a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for your children in your homeschool!

I have enjoyed knowing that I can pull up an art lesson at any time for any subject or topic in history without having to worry about availability or extra expense, because the Membership includes everything! 

My boys never get tired of learning through art, because it gives their hands something to do while we learn. Not only are they gaining art skills and proficiency, but they are also adding facts and understanding as they paint away with their chalks. 

I love how Chalk Pastel video art lessons give me a multi-dimensional way to bring history into full color for my children in our homeschool.

Bonus! When the lesson is done, we have beautiful artwork to share and hang around our classroom. These visual reminders of our lessons help us review and retell our learning long after we clean the chalk off our hands. 

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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Engaging English Activities For Homeschooling High School: A Quick Guide

Every subject has its stereotypes, from the explosions in chemistry classrooms to the English teacher’s droning monologue. But there is no reason to stay stuck in boring made-for-tv versions of school and learning. Even if you truly did have a boring English class growing up, your children don’t have to. These English activities for homeschooling high school are amazing resources available to us today! 

Teaching High School English In Your Homeschool

Create a learning environment in your homeschool that visually encapsulates the wonder of the written word and the magic of storytelling.  High School English in your homeschool can come to life by infusing your studies with imagination, hands-on activities, and student-led learning. 

The Value Of Adding Art To English For High School Learning

I have long been a fan of interdisciplinary learning (AKA, unit studies!). When I taught in a traditional classroom, my students would write creative newsletters for history class, design advertisements for the school play using persuasive language, or create poems about math!

As a homeschool mom, I’ve loved adding art to all our subjects with the help of Nana’s wide range of video art lessons. We have used chalk pastel art to study birds, outer space, ancient history, and more. 

English is no exception! When students enter high school, there may be a tendency to isolate the academic subjects from each other. Yet art remains a wonderful way to explore and express knowledge and learning in the English classroom.

Through art, you can prove multi-sensory learning for your older student. Not only will they read a story, hear a story, and/or write a story, but they can also visualize the story through their drawings! 

by Erin, Hobbit Art Lesson

What better way to make the setting of the Shire come to life than by painting a Hobbit hole?

Or how can you show the poignant moment of the March family longing for their father to return from the war than by drawing Mrs. March reading one of her husband’s letters and imagining scenes of war? 

Literary concepts and storylines truly come alive when visualized. Students who may struggle to explain themselves in words, can share their understanding of a piece of literature through art! 

Engaging English Activities For Homeschooling High School

All aspects of storytelling can be expressed using the art lessons from You Are An Artist. Here are just a few ideas: 

Character Analysis: 

Explore characterization by drawing main characters. You can have a fine discussion of protagonist and antagonist while you draw. Or, compare main characters and secondary characters. Discuss character traits, flaws, and what makes a character a hero or a villain in the story. 

Read Little Women and draw Jo March. Discuss how the description of Jo in the novel is reflected in your drawing. How is Jo’s appearance similar to her personality? 

Draw Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice. Discuss how the author and the character are similar and different. I especially love how Nana draws Elizabeth alone by the cliff, instead of in a drawing room. Perhaps discuss how setting and character work together in this scene. 

English activities for homeschooling high school
Study the Excellent Literary Works of Jane Austen

Description and Setting: 

So many iconic settings of literature can be brought to mind with a single image. Like the lamppost of Narnia. Or the Hobbit door of The Shire. 

High schoolers can start with one of Nana’s lessons depicting story setting, like: 

Encourage students to find examples of setting description in the novel they’re reading to quote as captions below their drawings. This helps students learn to provide text evidence from their reading for what they just drew. 

As an extension, students could draw other scenes from their reading using what they’ve learned fro Nana’s lessons. 

Storyline, Plots, and Conflict: 

I especially love Nana’s Letter to Home Little Women lesson for discussing storyline. Not only does it depict setting (the March house), but it also captures the issues facing the March family in this novel. The conflict of living in genteel poverty during wartime is shown in the simple hearth setting. Enduring years without a father/husband because of war and all the politics of war is also revealed in the painting. We see so many touches of home life here to discuss how the plot of this story centered around home life in the March family. 

Homeschooling high school English comes to life with imagination, hands-on activities, and student-led learning. 

Going an An Adventure  with J. R. R. Tolkien is another lesson where plot is portrayed. The concept of “the journey” is illustrated in this scene. Young readers can discuss how the plot and conflict of this story centers around the Fellowship and their journey. You could also have a conversation about how each character shown adds to the conflict or plot. and the role of friendship in coming to a resolution. 

In addition to using these literature-based chalk pastel lessons to illustrate story elements and spark discussions, student can use their artwork in other ways: 

  • Cover art for reports and research papers. 
  • Storyboards to outline the narratives. 
  • Illustrations with favorite quotes as captions. 
  • Visual aid for oral presentations of their reading. 
English activities for homeschooling high school
by Erin, A Lord of the Rings Study to Rule Them All

Additional Resources For High School Homeschooling

Literature can quickly become boring if students don’t have creative outlets to express and share their learning. Students crave being actively engaged in the learning process. Small children show us this easily, because they uninhibitedly touch and grab and play with things while we try to teach them. But older students have learned to sit quietly. Quiet listening is a good skill but it can also mask a disengaged learner. 

Other subjects also benefit from an art connection.

History can be dry as dust unless you draw Presidents with Nana and hear various tidbits about each famous person. Or study ancient architecture like the pyramids, the Coliseum or medieval castlesCheck out these additional Chalk Pastel Ancient History ideas.

English activities for homeschooling high school

Nana has a long list of American History lessons. High schoolers might enjoy learning more about the Three Branches of Government or the Constitution with art! Check out 7 American History Homeschool Lessons.

Or create brilliantly illustrated scientific diagrams of cells and bacteria in Science class. Find loads of cell activity ideas with chalk pastels here.

Create an eye-catching deep dive study into Moon Missions complete with illustrations of each of the space shuttles. 

Geography becomes hands on with video art lessons on landmarks like Stonehenge and the Taj Mahal. These would pair wonderfully with some current event learning and mappingFor more Chalk Pastel Geography ideas, look here.

Discuss social movements like Suffrage and Civil Rights with Nana’s lessons. 

Truly, every academic subject can be enhanced by an art connection. Nana has given homeschool families nearly 800 different lessons in the You Are An Artist collection that can touch every subject imaginable!

Providing opportunities to engage all the senses via art expression creates a multi-sensory approach to studying English literature, and other subjects. These chalk pastel art lessons make time-honored stories come alive in fresh ways for your teen student. 

I highly recommend adding these English activities for homeschooling high school and for your other subjects. Your children will be delighted, and you will find yourself just wanting to add more and more chalk pastel to your week! 

English activities for homeschooling high school

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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Small But Mighty Cell Activities For Your Homeschool

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. In fact, online cellular biology lessons are an excellent addition for your homeschool science. Take a look!

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

When it comes to making learning fun, homeschool parents don’t have to look far. Kids are fascinated with what makes them…well, them! They love to see the inner workings of things. What is more intricate and endlessly fascinating than the human body? 

Cells are like mini-worlds unto themselves. They make up our very existence, yet they exist beyond our eyesight. This whole “universe” of cells is a captivating world to explore through hands-on activities like experiments, crafts, and art! Consider these small but mighty cell activities as you plan your homeschool science curriculum. 

Make Learning About Cells Fun

What’s more hands-on than the human body? We all have one, right? Kids will be engaged by what they can learn by simply observing their own body. When our family studied human anatomy, my boys loved that they used their bodies as part of the experiments and activities. 

Yet as much as we can observe so much of the human body’s wonder from the outside, it’s a million times more astounding to consider what goes on at the cellular level! 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Cell Activities For Your Homeschool

Want to give your kids insight into the microscopic world beyond our sight, but right below our skin (and on and in it too!)?

  • Enlarge the cell
  • Model the cell
  • Watch the cell in action
  • Draw the cell
These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Enlarge the cell.

You probably eat single cells for breakfast! Yes, a chicken egg starts out as a single cell. Show your child an egg, and explain to them the simple parts of a cell: the cell wall, membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus can all be “seen” in a cracked egg!

Model the cell.

Now that kids have a sense of the major parts of a cell, dive deeper into some of the smaller pieces. In our study of cells, we created an edible cell using gelatin and candies. So fun and delicious. You’ll need a package of jello, a bowl, and a variety of small candies to represent the organelles (parts of a cells) like the mitochondria, golgi bodies, ribosomes, and more. 

You can find a detailed edible cell model to follow here

jello model for homeschool cell activities

Watch cells in action.

Show your kids the “cellular highway” of capillaries and veins that your blood cells travel on. One quick (and to my boys, humorous) way to do this is by shining a flashlight under their tongues while they look in a mirror. There, they will spot a “roadmap” of multicolored veins that give a glimpse of how special cells like blood cells travel around the body!

We even made a model of the blood using corn syrup, candy red hots, and candy sprinkles. Have you kids mix this up to see how various cells are different sizes and how they travel through plasma. 

Draw the cell.

In Nana’s newest I Drew It Then I Knew It series, kids get hands on with science by painting and labeling a diagram of some of our smallest parts! 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Online Cellular Biology Lessons Perfect For Your Homeschool Study

Whether you’re studying human body cells, plant cells, or the chemical makeup of our world, these science art lessons will fit your homeschool science. 

Nana has included a wonderful “opener” lesson in her Lab Coated Scientist class. My oldest created a painting of a scientist researching in a book, with swirling scientific symbols above his head. While this scientist is drawn as a chemistry teacher by Nana, my oldest changed the book to read “Biology” to match our current science studies. He replaced Nana’s chemical notations with a DNA strand and a bacterium! Kids can be so creative with these lessons. 

This scientist painting would be perfect to have as a cover for any note booking or portofolio of your child’s work. 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Diagram A Cell

After doing some of the hands-on activities above, have your child paint and Diagram a Cell. Nana does a wonderful job of helping students visualize the cell through their chalk pastel “microscope” as they look for the cytoplasm, nucleus, mitochondria, and cell membrane. If your students have learned other parts of the cell, why not have them include this knowledge into their drawing as well. This video art lesson is the perfect choice to add to a science journal or notebooking collection. 

Diagram Bacterium

The colorful Diagram of a Bacterium lesson helps kids learn about another kind of cell that can be lurking in your body. Whether harmful or helpful, bacteria exists everywhere, and yet is a different kind of cell than what makes up your body structure. After this lesson, kids can discuss proper hygiene (here’s a free hand washing printable you can use!), proper nutrition (talk about probiotics in their yogurt!), and discuss which kinds of bacteria are harmful or helpful.

diagram of bacterium
These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Diagram of an Eye

Diagram of an Eye helps students learn the various parts of the eye. What is special about this lessons is how students get to label the eye as we see it, and as it looks from inside the body!

Biology and Chemistry

DaVinci’s Vetruvian Man painting makes a great finish to a series on the human body. This makes a wonderful lesson in the proportions of both artwork and the human body. As you sketch out the  dive into the concept held by this Old Master that “everything is connected.” Our cells are microscopic, but work together to create a larger system. In the same way, people are smaller parts of God’s much larger universe. 

The Light Prism with Sir Isaac Newton lesson would be a fantastic intro lesson for studying chemistry and physics. Is it so beautifully colorful and symmetrical, you will want to frame this artwork after your kids create it!

For additional scientific artwork, try the Daffodil lesson where kids will paint a gorgeous yellow daffodil with their chalks and label the parts of a flower. You might revisit your cell painting and discuss how a plant cell is slightly different than an animal/human cell. 

More Homeschool Science Lessons From You Are An Artist

Science doesn’t end with the human body, of course. Our boys have enjoyed so many science lessons from Chalk Pastel. 

For a great Astronomy study, the Hubble Space Telescope Lesson can be a jumping off point for a Space unit. Follow it up with any of the Space Exploration Clubhouse lessons, but my favorites would be the Spiral Galaxy and the Nebula lessons. Students can draw all the planets in the Milky Way with the Solar System Clubhouse lessons. 

If you’re studying Physics, you should check out the Electric Light and Electric Lightning lessons!

For an Earth Science study, you’ll love the volcano, tornado, and northern lights video art lessons. 

Studying habitats? Draw a Marsh or paint the habitat Under the Sea

A study of Zoology might use any of the dozens of animal art lessons from Nana. Frogs are always a great place to start because they are a great animal for discussing life cycles. The John James Audubon lesson plus the Birds Clubhouse lessons are also wonderful for Biology and Zoology studies. 

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Each science-themed art lesson from Nana focuses on a science concept that opens a door for further investigation, study, and discussion. Nana does such a wonderful job of dropping “breadcrumbs” of interesting and relevant facts as she gives her chalk pastel instruction. 

I am always amazed at how much a simple painting session can spark a deeper level conversation with my boys. Even if you only select a single video art lesson to complement your science studies, these lessons are small but mighty cell activities you’ll want to include in your homeschool science!

These online cell activities for your homeschool are multisensory and appropriate for all ages. Online cellular biology lessons included.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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Engaging Charlotte Mason Geography Activities For Your Homeschool

Offer engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool with map study, drawing, and discussion. All of these are vital to a vibrant understanding of history!

Enjoy these engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool. Map study, drawing, and discussion are vital to an understanding of history.

The Benefits Of Geography Study In Your Homeschool

It’s hard to imagine understanding the classic story Heidi, without the beautifully described Swiss Alps setting the scene. Or to appreciate the majestic nature of the Great Pyramids, without visualizing how they rise up out of flat desert. Or empathize with Mary and Joseph’s ninety-mile journey to Bethlehem, without knowing about the rocky, difficult terrain they traveled. 

So much of history and literature depend on the surrounding geography, which is why map study, drawing, and discussion are a large component of our homeschool time. Our current ability to understand world (and space!) geography is like never before, with satellite imaging, extremely accurate and up-to-date mapping, and the ability to share pictures and videos from around the world at a keystroke. 

With so many options, there are many ways to include geography in a child’s learning. 

How Did Charlotte Mason Teach Geography?

Charlotte Mason, Great Britain’s famous home educator advocated for the teaching of geography in three gentle but effective ways. Each of these methods puts geography into a context of the people culture of each land. 

Offer engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool with map study, drawing, and discussion. All of these are vital to a vibrant understanding of history.

Narration is an effective strategy for geography study if you use a living geography text. Simply Charlotte Mason recommends Material World and Hungry Planet: What the World Eats to get you started learning geography the Charlotte Mason way.

Mason’s method of using living books is the perfect geography instruction strategy. Reading delightful books that feature a strong geographic setting engages the reader’s imagination. For example, one year the boys and I were delighted to travel with Paddle-to-the-Sea through the Great Lakes. Nearly every quality literature book features geography in some way!

Think about where the Ingalls family traveled in the midwest in the Laura Ingalls series. Or how much the topography of Maine plays a role in books like One Morning Up in Maine and Mrs. Rumphius.  

Map work is essential to understanding geography. Kids need to know how to use a map or globe. I want my boys to have a general sense of where countries are located on the globe, where they are relative to other countries, and important topographic and climate features. Did that last sentence make you want to snooze? Me too! It’s easy to get caught up in the “teacher-speak” of learning, and forget that kids are not interested in the technicalities of why we do what we do. I love how Charlotte Mason-style education focused on practical application of knowledge.

It’s important to keep map work light and exciting for kids, allowing them to nearly immediately apply what they are learning to a discussion or activity. Build their knowledge base with these living lessons and activities. Then let that knowledge naturally extend in their older years into deeper conversations and connections. Here are a few ideas: 

  • Look up locations whenever you read a book. Maybe put a flag on a map to keep track of where all the characters from the books you read live! 
  • Do quick map drills to label certain sections of a printed map. Start with only a few labels and add more through the year as they master groups of map labels. 
  • Try a quick “show me, tell me” pointing game, or put chocolate chips or small cereal pieces on map locations and let kids eat the ones they can name. 
FUN hands on learning with Charlotte Mason Geography Activities

Charlotte Mason Geography Activities For Your Homeschool

And of course, geography wouldn’t be geography without… cartography! Drawing maps is another method we use to study geography in our homeschool. Sometimes we trace our printed maps, but other times, I like the boys to draw freehand maps and label important places. 

Engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool with map study, drawing, and discussion. All are vital to an understanding of history.
British Isles map skills - Engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool with map study, drawing, and discussion. All are vital to an understanding of history.

Often, they will draw maps that go along with a literature study. The missionary biographies from the YWAM Christian Heroes Then and Now series perfectly suits our geography studies, because there are titles from all over the world. I love how each book cover features a map of the country the missionary travels to. We can match these books up to so many Chalk Pastel video art lessons! 

Draw Great Britain, Scotland, and Ireland to go along with George Mueller. A map of China goes along with Hudson Taylor or Gladys Aylward. Outline Africa when reading about David Livingstone, C.T. Studd or Albert Schweitzer. Amy Carmichael’s and William Carey’s life may inspire a map of India painting.

Don’t forget about:

  • Italy
  • France
  • United States and Canada
  • Australia
  • Europe
  • South America
  • Antartica
  • Asia

Sometimes we draw maps to understand our Bible time. We have often discussed maps of where Jesus walked, the missionary journeys, or Mary and Joseph’s travels to Bethlehem and flight into Egypt. Learning the map of Israel is vital to a vibrant understanding of biblical times. In fact, map learning in general is vital to vibrant understanding of all history!

Engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool with map study, drawing, and discussion. All are vital to an understanding of history.
Draw maps of Bible times with hands on learning activities for your homeschool.
Engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool with map study, drawing, and discussion. All are vital to an understanding of history.

Maps can also help kids see the big picture of history. In our history, we follow a spiraling curriculum that cycles through three major segments of history: Ancient History, Medieval, and U.S. History. Each of these time periods have special focus on certain countries and areas of land. 

Drawing the land of Egypt and surrounding countries, my son was reminded of all we have studied in this year’s history topics! He even added some extra labels to the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea! We can’t wait to draw the Oregon Trail and the First Thanksgiving Voyage when we study U.S. History again! These are all perfect Charlotte Mason geography activities.

Draw a map of Ancient Egypt - Engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool with map study, drawing, and discussion. All are vital to an understanding of history.

Additional Charlotte Mason Geography Resources

Beyond mapmaking skills, learning a land’s important features and structures can also be part of geography study. We love studying picture atlases and fact-filled geography books that show us the major features of a country, the foods and animals native to that region, and other points of interest.

  • Children’s Picture Atlas (Usborne)
  • History Uncovered The U.S.A. (Usborne)
  • Children’s Discovery Atlas (Quarto Books)
  • See Inside Great Cities (Usborne)
  • Cathedrals by David Macauley
  • Pyramids by David Macauley
  • Castles by David Macauley

Usborne Books are fabulous resources both for picture atlases and other detailed books, like their lift-the-flap style See Inside Great Cities book. My youngest painted the Eiffel Tower with Nana after reading the Paris page of this book.

Eiffel Tower art lesson with Nana at You ARE an ARTiST.
Learn World Landmarks like the Eiffel Tower hands on art activities for your homeschool.

More landmarks:

Charlotte Mason geography activities can be closer to home too! Have younger kids draw maps of their home, their town, or even use map-making skills to plan a garden (real or make-believe).

For some creative geography fun, kids can draw maps of make believe lands like Narnia, the Hundred Acre Wood, or Middle Earth! This allows students to transfer their knowledge of real geography to an invented location. 

We really could spend all day pouring over maps and studying the features of the world we live in. After all, if we don’t have an understanding of where we live, how can we learn to appreciate the similarities and differences of people who live in far away and unfamiliar places? Study of geography is not just fascinating, but also helps us connect with and love other people in this world.

Enjoy these engaging Charlotte Mason geography activities for your homeschool. Map study, drawing, and discussion are vital to an understanding of history.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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A Little Women Unit Study For Your Homeschool

This literature-based Little Women Unit Study For Your Homeschool includes hands on art lessons, Mother Culture and more ideas around the beloved novel.

If you have never read the novel Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, then you certainly are missing out on one of the most heartwarming, beloved stories of American literature! This homeschool unit study will help you and your family get started.

Whether it’s the cherished characters, the story of perseverance through difficulties, or the warm setting of home and hearth, Little Women will quickly become a favorite. 

When I was young, I read through Alcott’s classic books regularly, as I was drawn to the quiet grit (and fiery spirit, in the case of Jo March!) of the characters. The fact that one character is a writer didn’t hurt this aspiring young writer!

Children will love hearing the way families back home during the American Civil War contributed, survived, and rallied. Marmee’s gentle mothering seems to reach through the pages to ask you to put up your feet, wrap a quilt around your shoulders, and enjoy a cup of tea by a humble fire. 

One thing I love about Alcott’s novels is how they are accessible for younger children and delightful for adults. Adding Little Women to your homeschool literature study is sure to engage the whole family with this beloved novel. 

This literature-based Little Women Unit Study For Your Homeschool includes hands on art lessons, Mother Culture and more ideas around the beloved novel.

Language Arts In Your Homeschool and Mother Culture

I’m trying to be more intentional about “mother culture” this year, which simply means to cultivate your own growth and spiritual/intellectual nourishment so you can pour into your children. I thought, what better place to start than with Little Women, and the literary mom, Marmee, who loves her family so well. So I have been gathering materials and books to do an author study of Louisa May Alcott, and re-read some of her novels.

As part of my mother culture study, I decided to complete the Letters to Home Little Women video art lesson by Nana! Usually I would have my children do these art lessons as part of our homeschool curriculum. During the art lessons, I’m busy nearby to help with selecting chalks, cleaning smudges, guiding through any trouble spots, and clean up. But I don’t often get to complete a whole painting. 

Mother culture is easy with Nana's art lessons to match your favorite literature!

I didn’t realize what a rare treat it would be for me to sit down by myself and paint the scene from Little Women where Marmee and the girls receive a letter from their father, who is away fighting in the Civil War. 

This lesson, filled with small details and summaries from the book, is a bit more detailed and perfect for upper elementary and older students. 

As I sat and drew with Nana, I experienced first-hand why “I Drew It Then I Knew It” is the mantra of so many of the ChalkPastel.com series! When you draw and listen to Nana’s explanations, you really do become immersed in the learning. The facts become more memorable because you engage many senses at once: visual, auditory, kinesthetic.
I encourage parents to complete a chalk pastel art lesson on your own. Just for yourself!

As I sat and drew with Nana, I experienced first-hand why “I Drew It Then I Knew It” is the mantra of so many of the ChalkPastel.com series! When you draw and listen to Nana’s explanations, you really do become immersed in the learning. The facts become more memorable because you engage many senses at once: visual, auditory, kinesthetic. 

I think it is easy for us as parents, especially homeschool parents, to be more of a learning “manager” than join in as a student in the learning process. Yet, we are all lifelong learners, and need to make time to experience the learning process for ourselves from time to time. There’s no better place to start a culture of family learning than with the March family who are shining literary examples of family life. 

I encourage parents to complete a chalk pastel homeschool art lesson on your own. Just for yourself! (And I even just realized that Nana has a “parent track” of lessons just for us! Go check it out starting with the adventure Tea Cup!). You might also like to see how Erin uses chalk pastels for mini moments for mom.

This literature-based Little Women Unit Study For Your Homeschool includes hands on art lessons, Mother Culture and more ideas around the beloved novel.

Little Women Homeschool Art Lessons

Whether you complete a Little Women literature study for yourself or with your children, ChalkPastel.com has many lessons that coordinate with the novel!

This literature-based Little Women Unit Study For Your Homeschool includes hands on art lessons, Mother Culture and more ideas around the beloved novel.

The Letters to Home video art lesson is a wonderful introduction to the story, setting the scene and introducing many of the characters. 

Arguably, the most dynamic character is Jo March, daughter, sister, writer, and friend. Draw this beloved character with a focus on her wild and well-known mess of beautiful hair, along with her quote about “good strong words.” Nana shares her favorite “Jo” moments from the book as she paints. 

The video art lesson of all four March Sisters would be a great painting lesson for when you finish reading the book. By then, your kids will recognize all the sister characters. Nana likes to leave the decision up to you about which figure is which sister, and that would be a fun discussion to check for understanding after reading. Families will enjoy this overview of each of the March girls.

Speaking of the I Drew It Then I Knew It study guides, the Companion Workbook for Literature includes several pages of facts and discussion questions for Little Women that will be valuable to any language arts unit study or read-aloud time! 

Little Women Homeschool Literature Studies for the homeschool parent too!

Additional Resources For Homeschool Literature Study

What else can you add to a Little Women literature study? Here are a few supplemental ideas: 

Tea Time with the March Family. Hold a tea party at some point while you do a read-aloud. And invite someone over! Visitors were common at the March home, so you can practice hospitality while you sip and read! 

Tea time with Little Women Unit Study for Your Homeschool

Hands on Handiwork. Have your children try out some handiwork activities. Get a small embroidery kit, learn how to sew on buttons, or complete a decoupage project. Monogramming  clothing or belongings was popular during the time period of Little Women. Try this easy simple button sewing project to make a Monogrammed Button Bag with your kids. 

Build in home economics tasks. Bake bread, create a shopping list and shop on a small budget. 

Practice Acts of Service. The March family repeatedly served others throughout the novel. In fact, it was Beth’s selflessness that eventually led to her tragic end. Complete an act of service like creating a care package for a sick friend or neighbor. Write letters to military members, like the sisters wrote to their father in the Army. Donate clothing and toys. If the March family were real and alive today, no doubt they would be examples of overflowing hospitality we could follow. 

Explore the Orchard House. If you’re in the New England area, you can visit the Louisa May Alcott homestead, the Orchard House in person in Massachusetts. If you’re too far, a Virtual Tour is available for purchase! Or read this summary of the Alcott home and family members.

Enrich yourself as a parent. For parents interested in pursuing more Mother Culture as you provide a home education to your children, consider reading biographies about Louisa May Alcott. You’ll feel equipped to add details to your family discussions. 

You ARE an ARTiST Complete Clubhouse for hands on art lessons for your homeschool!
Little Women Homeschool Literature lessons

And perhaps carve out some time to sit down with a cup of tea and an art lesson like I did, and give yourself the treat of an afternoon of art with Alcott. 

However you choose to include art and Little Women’s timeless tale of home, you will certainly walk away richer in heart and spirit. Time spent with the fictional March family is always rewarding.

This Little Women Unit Study For Your Homeschool includes hands on art lessons, ideas for Mother Culture and a literature study for this beloved novel.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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Homeschool Resources For Learning About The Winter Olympics

Enjoy these homeschool resources for learning about Winter Olympics! The Games are a great opportunity for all kinds of hands on art activities and fun around a favorite sport.

Does winter make you want to burrow into a cozy nook and sleep the cold away? For some of us, that’s our reaction to the onset of cold and snowy days. But for other people, especially winter sports enthusiasts, winter is time to step into some skis, skates, or other gear and have a great time in the snow and ice!

Even if you do like to huddle close and stay warm, your family can enjoy winter sports as spectators of the Winter Games! 

Enjoy these homeschool resources for learning about Winter Olympics! The Games are a great opportunity for all kinds of hands on art activities and fun around a favorite sport.

The Winter Games: An Overview

Much like the Summer Games, the Winter Games are held every four years, but staggered on the even years when there are no Summer Games. And in the winter, of course! The focus is on sports played on snow and ice, whether indoors or out! 

Although the Summer Games hark way back to ancient times, the Winter Games were first played in 1924. They feature a variety of sports that your children may never have heard of (curling?), and can be a great opportunity to introduce your family to new favorite sports in the snow!

China is the host country of the 2022 Winter Games opening ceremonies and the ice sports competitions will be held in Beijing. The games are numbered with Roman numerals, so this is the XXIV Olympic Winter Games! Two other regions, Yanquing and Zhangjiakou will also host some of the events. You can follow along with this 2022 Winter Olympics Schedule

The Winter games is not just fun to watch, but it’s also an educational event you can discover in your homeschool! Chalk Pastel has so many video art lessons that serve as wonderful introductions to the Winter Games. Clubhouse members can enjoy the I Drew It Then I Knew It workbook. The workbook offers a planner, questions, and fun facts and interesting details about the most popular Summer and Winter Games events. 

If your family plans to enjoy watching the Winter Games, there is also a new Games Medal Count printable in the workbook, so you can track your favorite countries achievements!

Enjoy these homeschool resources for learning about Winter Olympics! The Games are a great opportunity for all kinds of hands on art activities and fun around a favorite sport.
homeschool art lessons for the Winter Olympics

Homeschool Winter Games Video Lessons

Bring out the chalk pastels and get ready to enjoy the Winter Games in the warmth of your dining room or study area. Nana’s winter games lessons cover the main ice and snow sports of the Winter Games. The various sports included in the Games have changed slightly over the years, but the fan favorites remain the ones Nana has included in her lessons. 

Ice skating art lesson for your homeschool

Ice skates are a common piece of equipment in various events at the Winter Games: Figure skating, speed skating, short track skating and hockey. Nana covers how to draw a basic ice skate, and teaches kids about the different parts of a skate: boot, blade, laces. She talks about the special laces competitive skaters use. 

Hockey is one sport that uses ice skates, and Nana has a lesson dedicated to this sport! My kids didn’t know much about hockey, but they enjoyed going virtually with Nana to a hockey game to learn about this sport. Nana encourages kids to personalize their drawings by giving “pizzazz” to their hockey stick and puck. I love that although Chalk Pastel lessons are step by step, there are always opportunities to get creative and make the picture your own. 

Enjoy these homeschool resources for learning about Winter Olympics! The Games are a great opportunity for all kinds of hands on art activities and fun around a favorite sport.

The bobsledding chalk pastel lesson gives kids an opportunity to create their own four-person bobsled team and decorate the helmets and sled to their liking. Or, they can follow Nana’s lead and make a Team USA sled! 

For more Winter Games fun, paint the Downhill Skier lesson. This lesson is unique in that artists will paint a silhouette of a skier. This both introduces artists to the concept of the silhouette, and makes drawing people attainable for young artists, because there are no faces or details to draw!

Hockey and snowboarding winter games art lessons
Enjoy these homeschool resources for learning about Winter Olympics! The Games are a great opportunity for all kinds of hands on art activities and fun around a favorite sport.

Painting a snowboarder is a bit more detailed and takes a little time. My oldest enjoyed working on his painting of this sport. In this lesson, Nana paints Olympic athlete Shaun White flipping through the air on his snowboard in a previous Winter Games in South Korea! This is an exciting “action shot” painting! 

I love how in many lessons, Nana stresses the importance of being forgiving with your art! This is so helpful to my youngest, who wants his pictures to be so perfect. I love how Nana reassures him that even if we make a small mistake or paint outside the lines, we can be forgiving as we create! Nana’s positive influence is very helpful to me as a parent teaching my children art! 

Enjoy these homeschool resources for learning about Winter Olympics! The Games are a great opportunity for all kinds of hands on art activities and fun around a favorite sport.

Fun Activities To Help You Learn More About The Winter Olympics

Besides drawing, there are so many winter olympics resources to help your kids learn more about the Winter Olympics! 

Check out this Winter Olympics Homeschool Ideas post to find ideas for celebrating the Opening Ceremonies, the geography of different countries represented at the Games, and creating fun decorations or enjoying foods from around the world. The author also has game schooling, history, book and movie recommendations for homeschool moms to pick from and create a delightful diversion from regular lessons. 

Fun activities to help you learn more about the Olympics
Homeschool video art lessons for your family

One thing we did to make our Winter Games chalk pastel time a little different than usual, was create Winter Games flashcards to learn the different sports. 

I made a simple flashcard template that we used with each Chalk Pastel lesson. Each winter Olympic sport is listed at the top. The boys painted with Nana in the larger box. Then we read through the I Drew It Then I Knew it workbook pages for each of the sports. I had the boys take turns filling in the text box with a one-sentence summary of what they had learned about each sport. 

You could laminate these flashcards and cut them apart for some matching fun with younger kids who are more visual. 

You can get the flashcards template here to try this out in your homeschool! There is a flashcard labeled for each of Nana’s Winter Games lessons, plus a blank page for using this with other events you study. 

More Homeschool Video Art Lessons For Your Family

If you’re looking for more resources to round out your lesson plans: my Ancient History Reading List can provide a literature component to your Winter Games study. It includes suggestions for fiction and non-fiction about the Greeks. Or, segue from an ancient games study to a study of ancient poetry and art with my Ancient History Classical Morning Menu set!

How To Draw an Olympic Torch for The Games

Continue building excitement for the Winter Games before and during the event with Nana’s other lessons that coordinate so well: 

Kids can create their own Olympic torch relay, or learn about the opening ceremonies with Nana. Since the Games originated in ancient times, explore the ancient olympics and paint the Greek coliseum and a Laurel Wreath.

Sometimes it can be hard for kids to connect to sports that are unfamiliar or events that are far away around the globe. Painting the equipment and athletes of the winter games and including other art projects and hands-on activities about the history of The Games brings kids right into the moment of excitement as these athletes compete for gold medals. With these great Olympic resources, you and your family will celebrate a memorial Winter Games this year!

Enjoy these homeschool resources for learning about Winter Olympics! The Games are a great opportunity for all kinds of hands on art activities and fun around a favorite sport.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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A Winter Homeschool Snowflake Study With Snowflake Bentley

Enjoy a winter snowflake study for your homeschool! Fun learning with a Snowflake Bentley read aloud, online winter art lessons and snowflake activities.

This winter homeschool snowflake study combines the beauty of winter with the fascinating life of Snowflake Bentley.

In our part of New England, the arrival of the first snow is greatly anticipated. It can happen as early as October or as late as January. We watch the sky and weather reports eagerly for this delightful precipitation. 

What is this somewhat magical weather phenomenon that turns ordinary dreary rainfall into a puffy playscape for kids of all ages? 

It seems hard to believe it’s simply the temperature dropping! Yet, it really is that simple. Let the red line drop below thirty-two degrees and our dreams of a white winter crystalize into reality! Our breath plumes white to match the snow, and suddenly the world is renewed! 

In our house, my boys have their boots on as soon as there’s a skim of snow to make tracks in. Snow angels, snowmen, snow ball fights, and sledding take up hours of their time until they’ve quite worn the snow out!

Whether you get snow in your area or not, you can create a winter snowflake study of this beautiful white fluffy stuff in your homeschool this year! Just gather a few simple materials to show your kids the wonder of these winter crystals.

“The snow crystals . . . come to us not only to reveal the wondrous beauty of the minute in Nature, but to teach us that all earthly beauty is transient and must soon fade way. But though the beauty of the snow is evanescent, like the beauties of the autumn, as of the evening sky, it fades but to come again.” ― Wilson A. Bentley

Learning About Snowflakes

There is no person better to start learning about snowflakes from than the man who dedicated his life to capturing these ephemeral water-stars. 

Wilson Bentley of Vermont said, “… from the beginning, it was the snowflakes that fascinated me most.” We agree, snowflakes are simply mesmerizing!

Wilson Bentley’s website contains a rich and lengthy biography, as well as several articles about snowflakes written by Bentley himself. Bookmark this site for some “mother culture” reading time as you plan your homeschool snowflake study. Bentley’s articles are written with as much beauty as their subject matter. 

Snowflake Bentley Homeschool Read Aloud

As the first person to ever capture a snowflake’s intricacy on camera, Wilson Bentley’s passion for snowflakes earned him the nickname “Snowflake Bentley.” His story is best enjoyed in the picture book by the same name. 

This read-aloud book is distinctive in that it uses two side-by-side narratives to share Snowflake Bentley’s story. The narrative under the woodcut illustrations lyrically tells the story of Bentley’s life and passion for snow. The margin text adds facts and scientific details that help the reader understand the excitement and importance of Bentley’s work. 

Bentley grew from a young boy who loved snow to a teenager who pursued his passions to a young man who determinedly persevered through failures. He knew there were “treasures in the snow” and he would gift these treasures to the world. 

And so he did. After decades of effort, he had a vast collection of snowflake photos compiled into a book: Snow Crystals. From passionate child to “snowflake authority” figure, Snowflake Bentley’s story is both endearing and insightful. 

Under the microscope, I found that snowflakes were miracles of beauty; and it seemed a shame that this beauty should not be seen and appreciated by others. Every crystal was a masterpiece of design and no one design was ever repeated. When a snowflake melted, that design was forever lost. Just that much beauty was gone, without leaving any record behind.” — Wilson Bentley

A Snowflake Bentley Study For All Ages In Your Homeschool

After reading about the startling beauty of snowflakes, children will definitely want to explore more! 

My boys took turns creating chalk pastel paintings to celebrate all things snow.

winter snowflake study
winter snowflake study

We started with the lesson on Snowflake Bentley and his camera. This lesson is perfect for older students because it’s a bit more intricate. 

The preschool lesson on snowflakes in Snow Clubhouse is short and sweet and delightful for beginners or younger students. Even a few minutes of painting with Nana helps kids to pause for a moment and consider the wonder of these tiny, transient winter gems. Nana’s patient instruction guides kids to wonder at the uniqueness of snowflakes as they draw. 

Bird in Snow is the perfect lesson to connect snowflakes to wildlife in your backyard – plus it uses black paper like Bentley’s black snowflake tray! The contrast of the chalk pastels on different colored backgrounds is stunning. 

winter snowflake study

My youngest painted Welcome Winter Snowman to celebrate the fun we can all enjoy with snowflakes! 

winter snowflake study

More Winter Homeschooling Resources

These snowy treasures of Bentley’s are well-celebrated in Nana’s Chalk Pastel lessons! Check out the ideas in this Winter Solstice celebration post. 

From a snowflake study, you can move easily to exploring other winter weather topics. Enjoy lessons on frosted leaves, icicles, beautiful frozen winter lakes at midnight and more with Nana. Your kids will see how snow, with its delicate, icy touch, creates beauty in all aspects of wintertime. 

Along with our chalk pastel lessons, we added in a few other hands-on craft activities. 

winter snowflake study

We were blessed beyond delight when the morning after painting our snow pictures with Nana, we had a suddenly snowfall! I handed out black construction paper and we rushed out to play Snowflake Bentley and collect our own snow crystals. Although I’m no photographer like he was, I managed to snap a few closeups to capture the detail of a handful of our flakes. 

The boys and I studied my photos later, commenting on the shapes, edges, and variety in our small sampling. When we draw attention to the fleeting beauty of snow, we’re teaching children to pay attention to even the smallest of things. This skill of noticing is foundational to keep our children enthralled with learning.

Later in the week, the boys and I made snowflakes. Snowflake cutouts can be simple and fun to make. Since my husband’s family is Polish, every so often, we attempt the Polish paper cutting technique of Gwiazdy (or, stars). Very similar to cutting paper snowflakes, but with more detailed cut-out designs. Just like snowflakes, no two are ever the same, no matter how we might try! 

winter snowflake study

We also designed snowflakes out of pipe cleaners. Extend this activity into a science lesson by making your own snow crystals! Kids can make actual crystal structures using a borax solution (especially wondrous if you live in an area that won’t have snow). 

You might also enjoy a Silent Winter Snow Walk using your senses. Find out how with our sister site, Homeschool Nature Study’s Outdoor Hour Challenge Instagram post!

However you choose to study snowflakes, whether reading, painting, or crafting, there is no doubt snowflakes are one of nature’s most beautiful wonders. The melt-away beauty of snowflakes never fails to melt hearts of nature lovers everywhere.

Of all the forms of water the tiny six-pointed crystals of ice called snow are incomparably the most beautiful and varied. – Wilson Bentley

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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If You Take a Mouse to the Movies Hands-On Homeschool Activities

When the nights turn chilly and darker, there are fewer places to go outdoors as a family. We usually see the return of “Family Movie Night” on Fridays in the fall and winter as a result. Our family loves watching movies based on books. Add a few hands-on homeschool activities, and everyone is ready for both learning and fun.

But whether you actually watch a movie or not after reading If You Take a Mouse to the Movies, the book itself is a delightful read for the little ones. 

The boys were excited to revisit this old favorite and bring their mouse stuffed animals along for a chalk pastel lesson. 

Add these hands-on homeschool activities with a fun look at If You Take A Mouse To The Movies. Pictures books and homeschooling together.

All About If You Take A Mouse To The Movies

If You Take a Mouse to the Movies is a sequel to If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. And if you haven’t read that book, stop right now and go get a copy! It makes this second book even more enjoyable because you and your child will recognize the familiar pattern of the story. 

We love this sweet tale of a little mouse who is easily distracted from one thing to the next. If this isn’t a picture of all parents everywhere with their toddlers and preschoolers, then I don’t know what is. 

So many fun activities! Add these hands-on homeschool activities with a fun look at If You Take A Mouse To The Movies. Pictures books and homeschooling together.

Even older readers enjoy the hilarious “cause and effect” sequence as the pages turn. From the movies to popcorn, from popcorn to decorating the tree, from the tree to a snowman, the story unfolds just how quickly one thing leads to another. 

All along the way, Mouse brings so much joy and energy to each endeavor that you, along with his friend, can’t help but indulge him “just this once” in his next idea!

Truly, as a parent this book always speaks to me about the serendipitous moments of life with kids, enjoying each experience, and greeting the day with more of an “open-hand” so you can just soak up the joy of being together. 

The illustrations are a delight as well! You can feel the coziness of the huge blanket, sense the flurry of snow, and understand the glitterful creativity of making ornaments. 

The best part of the story is at the end. Of course! I don’t want to give it away, but, let’s just say, the author does a great job of bringing things to a satisfying final page. 

Definitely the If You Give… series is a wonderful reading choices for kids and makes a great gift to give any small child or new parent. 

String popcorn with If You Take A Mouse to the Movies!

If You Take A Mouse To The Movies Homeschool Lesson

In our homeschool, a book is never just a book. It’s nearly always a jumping off point for more! This book is no different. You can have SO much fun with the themes of If You Take a Mouse to the Movies!

Start with a collection of Nana’s chalk pastel lessons to explore the fun activities the Mouse enjoyed in the book.

hands-on homeschool activities If You Take a Mouse to the Movies
hands-on homeschool activities
hands-on homeschool activities

Plan a movie night with your kids and set up a popcorn bar. You’ll need a great illustration to feature at your popcorn station so have your kids draw Movie Theater Popcorn from You ARE an ARTiST’s Chalk Pastels at the Movies series. 

hands-on homeschool activities
hands-on homeschool activities

In the book, Mouse decorates a tree. Kids can decorate their own tree with Nana when they paint Christmas Tree in the Snow. Or paint some Christmas Ornaments. I love how Nana encourages kids to decorate the tree and their ornaments to their liking. She always demonstrates how to create the painting but leaves so much creative room for young artists to make it their own. 

My oldest added the snowman to his Christmas Tree painting. We also completed the Winter Fun Snowman lesson and the boys enjoyed adding a few of their own sledding details to the scene. 

While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night hymn art lesson at You ARE an ARTiST
hands-on homeschool activities with Christmas hymn art lessons

Need a warm up? Grab a blanket and listen to some Christmas carols. Then pick one of the Christmas carol chalk pastel lessons from the Hymns course to paint. While Shepherds Watched Their Flock by Night or We Three Kings are good choices. For older students, try I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day, which has delightful details. 

The Christmas Angel or Gingerbread Man and Holly would also be great choices to go along with this book (and the original If You Give a Mouse a Cookie book!). 

Don’t forget to enjoy all that popcorn you popped! Just try not to get too distracted, like Mouse! 

Wonderful art display of hands on homeschool activities
hands-on homeschool activities to go with a book study on If You Take a Mouse to the Movies

More Picture Book Hands-On Homeschool Activities

I can’t ever get enough of pairing books with our other lessons. If you’re like me, you’ll want to follow this Mouse mini-lesson up with some of these hands-on homeschool activities: 

Little House on the Prairie Christmas – Several of the Little House books include Christmas scenes give a delightful peek into the world of pioneers and homesteaders from decades ago. Choose one of the books, or simply read a few of the Christmas chapters before painting this chalk pastel lesson. 

Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening – While this is actually a poem, not a story, several picture book versions have been made that help kids enjoy the visuals behind Robert Frost’s quintessential winter poem. 

Favorite Movies Homeschool Art Lessons – There are so many Chalk Pastels at the Movies options including this one with How to Train Your Dragon.

The Chronicles of Narnia – The first book people usually read from this series is The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, which is set during an eternal winter. Kids will enjoy painting the Lamp Post lesson from Nana to ago along with this classic novel. 

Heidi – Set in the Alps, Heidi feels like a cozy winter or Christmas read, don’t you agree? Paint those majestically rising mountains as you tend the goats with little Heidi in the pages of her story. 

hands-on homeschool activities

Nana has created a whole course to celebrate art and literature with hands-on homeschool activities! If you’re a Clubhouse Member at You ARE an ARTiST, check out the I Drew It Then I Knew It Literature series includes nearly twenty literature-themed art lessons. Plus, you can download the companion workbook which includes a planner, writing or discussion prompts, and fast facts for each book or poem! What a gem to add to your literature lesson planning!

If you have a favorite literature book, maybe you could share it with Nana. You never know when you’ll see your favorite title pop up as a new chalk pastel lesson!

So… if I give my kids some chalk, they’ll draw some pictures… and if they draw some pictures…there’s no telling where their imagination will lead them. Truly, one thing does lead to another when it comes to exploring with art and picture books! 

Add these hands-on homeschool activities with a fun look at If You Take A Mouse To The Movies. Pictures books and homeschooling together.

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available. 

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A Cranberry Thanksgiving Book Study For Your Homeschool

Here are just a few ways you can enjoy a Cranberry Thanksgiving book study in your fall homeschool plans – with art, activities, baking and more! Don’t miss Nana’s Mr. Whiskers homeschool art lesson at the end.

With the arrival of fall, our family dives into “baking” season. Maybe it’s the harvest time of year when fresh fruits are abundant. Or maybe it’s the crisp fall air that brings on those “comfort food” cravings. Either way, I find myself bringing out the old 1961 Betty Crocker cookbook and working through several well-loved recipes. 

As a New England family, the humble cranberry prevails during the fall season. Besides apple pie, what’s better than the tart flavor of cranberries to say “Thanksgiving is here!”?

Here are just a few ways you can enjoy a Cranberry Thanksgiving book study in your fall homeschool plans – with art, activities, baking and more!

A Cranberry Thanksgiving Book Study For Your Homeschool

And besides food, what captures the holiday mood better than reading a beloved story? We have quite a few on our list, but Cranberry Thanksgiving is a gem! We can thank Nana for helping us discover this fabulous read-aloud several years ago when I searched Thanksgiving lessons in my ChalkPastel.com membership

I went directly to our local library for a copy and was charmed by the delightful storytelling. Now we read this picture book every year!

Why Cranberry Thanksgiving Is a Wonderful Resource For Holiday Homeschooling

More books for your Cranberry Thanksgiving book study for your homeschool.

The scene opens on Thanksgiving Day with young Maggie collecting firewood with a friend, Mr. Whiskers, at the edge of a cold and lonely cranberry bog. The setting is a unique place, as probably most kids have never been to a cranberry bog before. (Years ago, the boys and I got to wade through a replica cranberry bog in New York City, and learning about cranberries was so interesting!). 

The illustrations convey the brisk, chilly winds of November in Maggie’s red cheeks coming in from the cold. You can almost smell the warm aromas of Thanksgiving dinner as she carries the turkey to the table. 

Grandmother, who closely guards her cranberry bread recipe, is unhappy to offer hospitality to the scruffy Mr. Whiskers, Maggie’s guest. Suspicious, she hides her recipe in the fireplace. 

As the story unfolds, you’ll have a wonderful opportunity to help your children compare and contrast both Maggie and Grandmother and their guests, Mr. Whiskers and Mr. Horace. 

The plot has some laughs and an important message. The moral of “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” lingers and the characters show mercy and forgiveness. This story opens the door to discussions of friendship and hospitality, which is the perfect theme for a Thanksgiving unit study. 

If you love Cranberry Thanksgiving as much as our family, you’ll want to get these companion book suggestions as well: Cranberry Autumn and Cranberry Christmas!

Cranberry Thanksgiving Art and Baking Homeschool Activities

Reading Cranberry Thanksgiving is a great jumping-off point for a homeschool unit study. As I mentioned, the story is rich with opportunity for discussion of plot, character, setting, and moral. The book also includes a recipe for Grandmother’s Famous Cranberry Bread! 

Cranberries are amazing fruits, and well-worth a deep dive for your Cranberry Thanksgiving book study, because they are not just rich with flavor for baking, they have an interesting history and provide vibrant color for fall art projects!

Baking with cranberries for Cranberry Thanksgiving homeschool study

Naturally, we took to the kitchen for a baking activity to go with our Cranberry Thanksgiving book study. We compared Grandmother’s recipe to the one we use and were delighted to see they are similar. So we blended the recipes to accommodate for the ingredients we had on hand. The boys decided to make muffins instead of a bread loaf, because they are more fun to eat, they said. 

Baking offers an opportunity to use math concepts like measuring, multiplication (if you’re doubling), as well as reinforce reading skills like following directions. Plus, baking as part of learning comes with a built-in reward system: warm cranberry muffins to eat!

While we waited for our muffins to bake, we created our own Cranberry Thanksgiving artwork. We chose art lessons that helped my boys explore both the characters and setting of our reading. 

Painting Mr. Whiskers from Cranberry Thanksgiving at You ARE an ARTiST. Here are just a few ways you can enjoy a Cranberry Thanksgiving book study in your fall homeschool plans – with art, activities, baking and more!
Mr. Whiskers Art Tutorial for your Cranberry Thanksgiving Book Study for homeschool.

Kids often have a difficult time drawing faces and people. The Cranberry Thanksgiving Chalk Art Tutorial with Nana feels so satisfying, because the features of Mr. Whiskers are large and simple. And it’s nearly impossible to make a mistake when you’re drawing overgrown whiskers! 

Painting Mr. Whiskers with Nana is extra fun, because the boys love the character so much, and delighted in giving their drawings extra-bristly whiskers, rosier cheeks, and the hairiest eyebrows possible.

Here are just a few ways you can enjoy a Cranberry Thanksgiving book study in your fall homeschool plans – with art, activities, baking and more!
Here are just a few ways you can enjoy a Cranberry Thanksgiving book study in your fall homeschool plans – with art, activities, baking and more!

Mr. Whiskers Homeschool Art Lesson

Suggested supplies: Construction paper, chalk pastels. Baby wipes or damp paper towel for easy clean up.

If you enjoy this art lesson, please be sure to share on social media and tag us. Nana would love to see your paintings and to comment!

To go along with the Mr. Whiskers character, the boys also painted the setting of the cranberry bog. This lesson gives beginners a chance to practice perspective and blending. 

Learn to paint a cranberry bog for your Cranberry Thanksgiving homeschool unit study.

If you have an artist ready for more (like my 11-year-old who adores all things art), have them try the Cranberry Thanksgiving chalk art tutorial of sketched silhouettes from Chalk Pastel’s sister site HodgePodge. It’s the cozy fireplace scene from the book! 

Younger artists can create a similar scene of the simple fireplace. I love that a You ARE an ARTiST Complete Clubhouse membership gives parents a range of levels so the whole family can create art at just the right level for each learner. I also enjoy the shorter, simpler art lessons for days when we don’t have a lot of time, but I still want to make room for art.

Once we were done drawing, we settled in for muffins, books, and enjoying our creativity!

cranberry muffins, Mr. Whiskers art, cranberry bog art, chalk pastels and Cranberry Thanksgiving books study for your homeschool.

More Thanksgiving Themed Learning Resources

Cranberry Thanksgiving homeschool book study.

Take a day or two and add in some art lessons and a couple books about cranberries and you have all the makings of a cozy homeschool unit study! 

If your kids want to learn more about cranberries, visit the Ocean Spray Cranberries in the Classroom website. There are dozens of printable resources and ideas about cranberry history, growing, harvesting, and traditions. 

Did you know cranberries only grow in five states in the country? Maybe you live in one of these cranberry-growing states!

Another fun fact: Cranberries are grown in bogs near wetlands. Most kids probably don’t live near a cranberry bog, but they may be familiar with similar wetland areas that can help them imagine this type of ecosystem.

Make a cranberry bog in a cup craft!

Join my kids in creating a “Cranberry Bog in a Cup” craft, where we learn about the various elements that make up a cranberry bog, providing important nutrients and protections for the cranberry vines. 

We also had fun “flooding” a mini bog of cranberries on our kitchen counter to observe how cranberries float because of the four air pockets inside the berry!

If the tart, red cranberry isn’t to your taste (or not available in your area just yet), try swapping out some of these activities for apple activities: 

  • Field Trip: Enjoy the tastes and colors of fall by going apple picking at a local orchard! 
  • Read-Aloud: Gather your favorite books about apples at the library.
  • Home Ec: Bake Nana’s Apple Pie Recipe. (Get the FREE recipe download! It’s a good one and great for framing as decor for the holidays!)
  • Art: Paint an Apple Pie with Nana. 
  • Celebrate: Enjoy that pie (or your cranberry bread/muffins!) together – the fruits of your labor!
Eat cranberry bread, paint a Mr. Whiskers painting, make a cranberry bog craft and read Cranberry Thanksgiving with your book study in your homeschool.

Year Round Holiday Lessons For Your Homeschool

Learn to paint a cranberry bog!

I’ve been so grateful that every season and every holiday, the lessons from Nana and Tricia at ChalkPastel.com are a perfect fit for any theme or lesson we’re doing in our homeschool. 

We’ll continue to extend our Cranberry Thanksgiving book study theme with even more of Nana’s Thanksgiving lessons as we move into the Thanksgiving season. 

Here are just a few more ideas for how you can use the Thanksgiving art tutorials that come included with your Thanksgiving Clubhouse Edition membership: 

Leading up to Thanksgiving:  

Quote: "Drawing with Nana is so satisfying... and it's nearly impossible to make a mistake when drawing overgrown whiskers!" - Julie Kieras at YouAREanARTiST.com

On Thanksgiving Day while kids wait for dinner: 

  • Paint the Thanksgiving Parade and then be sure to watch it live on Thanksgiving Day
  • Paint Thanksgiving Turkeys – cover with clear contact paper and use as Thanksgiving placemats for the kids!

Teaching my kids through art, reading, and hands-on study has been one of the biggest blessings of my homeschool mom life. Hands-on studies like this Cranberry Thanksgiving themed unit helps my kids engage willingly with the learning. (Because there’s food!). 

Plus, as a mom, I get to be actively involved, not just doling out assignments. Baking and doing art with my boys allows me to teach and learn right alongside them, and for that I am so grateful!

Teaching my kids through art, reading, and hands-on study has been one of the biggest blessings of my homeschool mom life. Hands-on studies like this Cranberry Thanksgiving themed unit helps my kids engage willingly with the learning. (Because there’s food!)

I hope you find some of these ideas help you come alongside your children in their learning, and discover the simple joys of reading, painting, and baking together—any time of year!

Julie is a teacher, writer and homeschool mom. Her blog Happy Strong Home shares encouragement for cherishing children, enjoying motherhood, and growing strong families. Discover homeschool resources, natural living tips, and family activity ideas. Julie has been featured on Million Praying Moms, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine, and the Melissa and Doug blog. She offers writing workshops and a “homeschool neighborhood” community to support parents in their homeschool adventures. Find Julie on Instagram to be the first to know when new workshops and community events are available.