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Homeschool Art for Middle and High School – You ARE An Artist

Finding homeschool art programs for middle and high school learning can be difficult.

It certainly was for me and my family.

The options seemed either too formal, or too babyish, for my older learners. But both of my boys have an interest in art and learn best with hands-on, multi-sensory activities. So I continued to search for a solution.

Thankfully, I found You ARE An Artist.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

I wanted options for learning beyond a basic art class. More than that, my youngest son clearly learns best when art is a part of other academic subjects. I was pleased (and a little relieved) to see how many opportunities for older learners are included in the Clubhouse Membership.

You ARE An Artist Courses For Middle and High School Homeschool

This is a small sample of the lessons we’ve done so far that have worked well for both my middle school and high school homeschoolers.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

History and Geography For Older Homeschoolers

  • American History
  • American Landmarks
  • Ancient History
  • Famous Composers
  • World Maps
  • World Landmarks

Science For Middle and High School Homeschoolers

  • Inventors
  • Moon Missions
  • Solar Eclipse
  • Solar System
  • Space Exploration
adding art to literature

Literature and Language Arts For Middle and High School Homeschoolers

Art Classes For Older Learners

How We Incorporate You ARE An Artist Lessons Into Our Middle and High School Learning

There are a couple of ways we have used You ARE An Artist to fuel our upper level learning.

The first is the most obvious, as we use You ARE An Artist for visual art credits in our homeschool. The second has been even more of a support in our homeschool. With these lessons, I have been able to incorporate art into our other areas of study to create a more robust and engaging learning experience.

You ARE An Artist For Homeschool High School Transcripts and Credit Hours

Because art is an elective that both of my boys would choose to take if they attended the school down the street, You ARE An Artist meets all the requirements for this type of credit.

I found this post from Courtney to be really helpful in figuring out what to “count” and how to reflect the learning on my son’s homeschool high school transcript. It outlines exactly how to accurately reflect art credit for high school using You ARE An Artist.

Incorporating Art Into Other Subjects For Middle And High School Learners

When my children were younger, it was a lot easier to find opportunities to weave art into our overall learning. As my boys have grown into middle and high school coursework, this became much more challenging, although no less important!

You ARE An Artist has made it not only possible, but easy for me to plan engaging, age appropriate activities for my older learners.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

For example, my son has an intense interest in the Harry Potter series. Although he has read them before, we decided to incorporate them in to our literature study this year, with a focus on character analysis.

At first glance, it might seem that this would have no real tie to any art, much less specific lessons with You ARE An Artist. But after searching the membership, it became clear that we had more than a few options available.

When my son and I discussed the sorting hat and its role as a lesser identified “character,” he completed a lesson with Nana, drawing the sorting hat and then practicing his handwriting (much needed!) with his favorite sorting hat quote.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

When the trip from Kings Cross to Hogwarts came up, my son created his own map of Great Britain with Nana as his guide.

  • He drew the map locations himself.
  • Next, he asked me to create the labels for his map (again, handwriting is a concern and he was so proud of his work, he didn’t want to “ruin” it.)
  • Finally, he was able to identify the locations on the map from memory, and point to them for me to label.

This is just a glimpse of why this approach to learning is so effective for children of all ages, even middle and highschoolers!

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

Time and time again, I am amazed at the benefit of adding art into our other academic subjects. You can see in this example, he not only comprehended the material, he retained it.

It’s what learning with You ARE An Artist is all about!

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This Is How Your Teen Can Earn An Art Credit For High School

Art Credit For High School

Are you homeschooling high school? Then as you know, it is a beautiful time to cherish memories made with your teen. You may also be at the point in your homeschool journey where necessary credits are getting completed. High school is the time to make sure that your student’s transcript is coming together nicely for whatever may be in store for them in the future. 

So, if you are in the process of completing high school credits for homeschool, you may need an art credit. Many states require one visual art credit for the completion of high school. If that’s the case for you, we will show you how simple it is to use You Are An Artist to obtain your student’s visual art credit. 

As fellow homeschoolers, we know that homeschool families like to plan their own way! That’s why You Are An Artist is an excellent fit for your visual art credit needs. Our flexible path to a visual art credit with chalk pastels allows you the freedom to plan; however it best suits your student. 

Art Credit For High School

Visual art is not only the process of creating art. The education goes far beyond that. Visual art with chalk pastels also encompasses learning about art history, culture, nature, and more. Luckily, here at ChalkPastel.com, we have over 700 chalk pastel lessons to choose from, including all of those very things!

No searching for the right projects or spending hours trying to map out your visual art curriculum! We have simplified earning an art credit for high school for you. We offer a Visual Art 1 pathway to either a full or half-credit. 

And if you are a homeschool parent, you can appreciate the combination of subjects. It’s a win-win when you can combine art and history, art and geography, and better yet – when you can include multiple students. Yes, you can do that with a Clubhouse Membership

Art Credit For High School

How Your Family Can Use You Are An Artist For a Visual Arts Credit?

First, check your local requirements to find out how many hours you need for a full or half credit. You will likely find your state requires somewhere between 120-150 hours of study for a full credit and 60-75 hours or a half credit. 

Once you have your requirements handy, you may want to map out your semester or year. An easy way to do that would be with our Visual Art 1 Credit Planner and Tracker. The planner and tracker are also perfect additions to your portfolio if record keeping is required in your state. 

You can plan art lessons to coincide with what you may be learning or books you may be reading this year – with over 600 available lessons to choose from in the Clubhouse Membership, planning out your art credit for high school with chalk pastels is super simple. 

Plus, choosing to pursue a visual art credit is affordable. Unlike many other electives, the supplies for chalk pastel art are minimal. So if your family is watching the budget like many of us are, it’s an economical option that requires few supplies. 

Art Credit For High School

What Can I Count As Visual Art Hours?

What can you count as hours towards your visual art credit? That’s a great question, and accumulating hours is easier than you think! Here are plenty of ideas and ways you can make all of your educational moments count. 

Chalk Pastel Projects: The projects themselves will take time, and the time per project will vary. Each project’s time will be different from student to student, depending on your child’s skill level. However, all of the time spent creating counts! Your teens will likely love this course; chalk pastel art is easy to enjoy.

Art Vocabulary List: Create an art vocabulary list to help your students learn all of the art terms you can find. You could use this list for learning definitions and even test or quiz your student. Another idea may be to have them research particular art terms and the history behind them. Where did the art term originate and when? The possibilities are endless.  

Chalk Techniques Definition List: We have a Chalk Techniques Definition List inside the Clubhouse to help your students get familiar with all chalk techniques. We recommend your student become familiar with this list. Like the vocabulary list above, you could quiz your teen on the list of definitions or do more extensive research on the terms if you choose. 

Field Trips: Yes, of course, field trips count too! And they happen to be a highlight for the whole family to enjoy. Plan a weekly or monthly outing to a nearby art museum, art fair, or art exhibit. Field trips are a fantastic way to experience art in real life. Take a camera to snap photos of your favorites or to try and recreate them later at home with pastels. Have your student bring a journal on the trip and make notes about what they saw. Or bring some chalk pastels along to draw while you are at the museum. You can get extremely creative in using this time for exciting learning opportunities. 

Art History: Watch documentaries about a particular artist or piece of art. Visit the library and check out books that cover art history, culture, and showcase works of art. Your students might veer off onto a rabbit trail as they begin to research the history of pastels themselves. Chalk and oil pastels can be traced back to the renaissance. Yep! The history is fascinating, and some of our most famous artists used chalk pastels. 

Critique Famous Chalk Works: Along with your art history studies, you will find that many famous works of art were created using pastels. Another exciting activity to assign your teen is to critique the pieces. You can dive as deeply into critiquing as you like, but there are some basic questions you can cover. What is the history behind the work? What sort of artwork is it? Ex. Portrait, nature, still life, landscape, abstract, etc. What kind of lines, shapes, and forms do you see? What colors do you see? Discuss space, light vs. dark, and focal points. You can also talk about interpretation; what is the artist trying to convey? Lastly, evaluate. How does the artwork make you feel? Do you like it? Why or why not? 

Submissions: Submissions are another fantastic way to challenge your budding artist and still calculate hours towards your visual art credit. Encourage your student to submit their own works of chalk pastel art into local contests. You can often find competitions to enter posted in your local library or college campuses. A simple Google search will produce all sorts of opportunities where your high school student can enter their art. You might even find fun entry opportunities at your state fair!

Final Project: Assign a final project for each semester or year-end. To determine a final art project, you may want to combine techniques or styles covered over the year. A final art project is a fantastic way to assess everything your teen has learned throughout the curriculum. It is also a fun way for your student to showcase all that he or she has absorbed. 

We hope this helps you easily plan your child’s Visual Art 1 curriculum for the year or semester. Make sure to get a Clubhouse Membership to access your Visual Art 1 Credit Planner and Tracker, along with the Chalk Techniques Definition List. 

We also invite you to join our private group. Inside of the, You ARE An Artist Community, you will find art submission opportunities for your teen along with plenty of art activities that the whole family can enjoy. See you inside!

Courtney is a Jesus-pursuing, native Texan, homeschool mom of three, and she believes homeschooling can be a peaceful and productive rhythm. At Grace, Grow & Edify she helps families create peaceful homeschooling atmospheres through faith, organizational strategies, and cultivating strong roots at home. She is also the founder of Homeschool Mastery Academy.