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Homeschool Art Curriculum for High School: Everything You Need For Your Teen

Art in high school is more than just another subject! This homeschool art curriculum for high school will give your students a tour of great artists with picture study and art projects – all while easily earning an art credit.

This homeschool art curriculum for high school will give your students a tour of great artists with picture study, art projects and an art credit.

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Homeschool Art Curriculum for High School

If you have never attempted art appreciation, you can start in high school and make it fun! You can have a rich and comprehensive high school art experience at home!

High school art level instruction takes very little planning and the effort can help bring balance and enjoyment to your homeschool week.

The Benefits Of Adding A High School Art Curriculum To Your Homeschool

As the parent, you can be a fellow student alongside your high schoolers. This will make the experience meaningful for the entire family! Here are just a few of the benefits for you as the homeschool teacher and for your children as homeschool students:

  • Your children will be more interesting people for knowing about art.
  • Spending time studying art and artists will allow you to talk about art and music with your young adult.
  • You will have shared experiences with depth and substance.
  • You can agree and disagree about art.
  • Your homeschool students will be able to join in with their own thoughts when an artist comes up in conversation.
  • Both art and music appreciation can become a part of who your children are.

An Overview Of Our Homeschool Fine Art Appreciation Curriculum For High School

Our high school art curriculum incorporates picture study in a Charlotte Mason manner. Artists and composers are covered chronologically.

Best of all, in just one hour of instruction per week, our high school art lessons inspire creative thinking and discussion.

Here is an overview of how our high school art program works:

Just three, easy steps!

  1. Open the plans and use the links included to find the artist online and view their artwork.
  2. Choose a piece of artwork and make it the desktop image on the computer. It is simple to find the painting online, right click and save to the desktop. Aim to change the painting once a week – unless you are simply wanting to enjoy the painting for longer.
  3. Gather facts about the artist, the art time period, the artist’s style and the medium used in the artwork. You can use the notebook pages included in the plans to gather information into an outline. This can culminate into a one or two page report on each artist. Your high schooler might also like their own critique of the artist’s work and include comparisons between artists studied.

Composer studies are included in our plans – to match the artists of the same time period!

Your Student Can Build a High School Art Appreciation Portfolio

We show your student how to build the portfolio throughout the year. Notebooking pages provided!

  1. All work completed with art appreciation can be collected into one binder and kept from year to year. This binder becomes an on-going record of the chronological study of art from prehistoric to modern.
  2. Simple is best! You can use a three-ring binder that you can slip a cover into and couple of dividers for notebook pages, coloring pages, art copywork (in sheet protectors) and end of the unit writing pieces.
What is art copywork? This homeschool art curriculum for high school will give your students a tour of great artists with picture study, art projects and an art credit.

What Is Art Copywork?

Art copywork is taking a piece of art and making your own version of it. This type of artist study nothing new and has been practiced by all the great painters of the past!

Art copywork is a lesson in observation and in learning how other artists solve problems. How do you create 3-D? How do you make the shadows? How do you draw a face? These are skills that can be practiced and mastered over time by closely observing great paintings and then making your own copy.

Art Books for Homeschooling High School

We recommend two, wonderful spine resources The Annotated Mona Lisa and The Story of Painting for all four years of our homeschool high school art curriculum.

the annotated mona lisa

The Annotated Mona Lisa for Homeschool High School Art

If you have to choose one book for your homeschool art curriculum for high school, choose The Annotated Mona Lisa. This book is a nuts and bolts book that will take you through the entire course of art history with no frills.

The Annotated Mona Lisa includes various topics other than just painting – like sculpture, photography, video, and architecture. Your high schooler can read a few pages a week and keep notes for their artist reports.

This homeschool art curriculum for high school will give your students a tour of great artists with picture study, art projects and an art credit.

Additional High School Art Appreciation Activities

In addition to the two recommended spine books as your art curriculum for high school, here are some optional resources that we have enjoyed as well:

  • Dover coloring books are a wonderful addition to your art appreciation studies. They are also wonderful to enjoy while listening to your current composer.
  • Composer studies – you can find out more about our high school music appreciation curriculum included with the high school art curriculum plans.
  • Your high schoolers can use a timeline. Print artwork from each artist and add to a timeline. This is a great way to tie art into your homeschool history studies.
  • How to Earn an Art Credit in High School? You can use our art credit tracker and this information to earn a homeschool art credit.
Art Credit For High School

More Fine Arts Resources for Your Homeschool

Our You ARE an ARTiST high school art and music plans pull together affordably priced materials along with internet links so you can have a reasonably priced art and music appreciation program. There are 32-36 weeks planned at each level, and this allows your family plenty of flexibility to complete the curriculum in one homeschool year. The plans are listed by grade, but you can also use Grades 1-8 family-style if you have multiple children at home.

You ARE an ARTiST Clubhouse members enjoy ALL Homeschool Fine Arts Plans at 50% off! —

Written by Barb 2011 and updated by Tricia 2022

This homeschool art curriculum for high school will give your students a tour of great artists with picture study, art projects and an art credit.

Growing a love of art at You ARE an ARTiST is a multi-generational passion! Tricia is Nana’s daughter and a mama of five children. Nana shared her first chalk pastel art lessons with her grandchildren around Tricia’s kitchen table. Homeschooling since 2000, Tricia has seen the fruits of home education with three homeschool grads so far! She shares the art and heart of homeschooling at Hodgepodge and is author of the book, Help! I’m Homeschooling! She and her husband, Steve, are also owners of sister sites Homeschool Nature Study and The Curriculum Choice.

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Homeschool Music Curriculum for High School

This homeschool music curriculum for high school is easy and suitable for fine arts transcript credit. Everything you need to get started.

There are so many benefits of studying music and great composers in high school! Here is the homeschool music curriculum for high school that makes it easy and suitable for fine arts transcript credit.

…music appreciation is different from playing an instrument in the same way that being a natural actor is different from enjoying a Shakespeare play, or being able to paint is different from enjoying a painted picture. I think that all children, not just the musically inclined ones, should learn to appreciate music.

-Charlotte Mason

Benefits of Homeschool Music Curriculum For High School

Why would you study music and composers in high school? With these studies, your high schooler can:

  • Grow a real love for wonderful music
  • Connect with art of all kinds
  • Discover a better understanding of how to express feelings and thoughts
  • Earn a fine arts credit!

You just may find that your high schoolers will make music and art appreciation their own. Your high schoolers might not push these studies aside when they get busy – but carve out time for them! Time to slow down and to listen.

Fun Example of John Willliams Composer Study

Here is an example of our homeschool music curriculum for high school with a study of composer John Williams. Enjoy this fun medley of John Williams compositions. It is guaranteed to put the tunes in your head for the rest of the day. Besides, it is designed by a clever young man who really worked hard a putting a great medley together. This may also give you some ideas if your high schooler is studying videography.

How to Use You ARE an ARTiST Homeschool Music Curriculum for High School

  • Our fine arts homeschool plans for high school can be enjoyed independently by your high schooler.
  • Schedule a composer of style of music to be listened to for a period of time.
  • Very few supplies needed. You can use the Classical Music Start Up Kit.
  • One afternoon a week, your high schooler can focus on one composer.
  • Your student uses the Listening Log included in the plans to record answers and thoughts. Remember, there are no right or wrong answers. It is perfectly acceptable for your student to write that he thinks that a certain selection of music is ‘annoying,’ if he has taken the time to listen and to respond.
  • Your high schooler then uses the log sheets to then write a biographical summary of the composer and to respond to the music he listened to. This is a written narration.
Fine Arts Curriculum for High School - There are so many benefits of studying music and great composers in high school! Here is the homeschool music curriculum for high school that makes it easy!

With our homeschool music curriculum, think of all of the great music you can listen to in those short, few minutes each week. It adds up over the course of a year and a lifetime and is well worth the effort!

View a Sample of Grade 11 Fine Arts Appreciation HERE.

More Fine Arts Resources for Your Homeschool

You ARE an ARTiST Clubhouse members enjoy ALL Homeschool Fine Arts Plans at 50% off! —

You ARE an ARTiST’s plans pull together affordably priced materials along with internet links so you can have a reasonably priced art and music appreciation program. There are 32-36 weeks planned at each level, and this allows your family plenty of flexibility to complete the curriculum in one homeschool year. The plans are listed by grade, but you can also use Grades 1-8 family-style if you have multiple children at home.

This homeschool music curriculum for high school is easy and suitable for fine arts transcript credit. Everything you need to get started.

Written by Barb McCoy and updated by Tricia Hodges

Growing a love of art at You ARE an ARTiST is a multi-generational passion! Tricia is Nana’s daughter and a mama of five children. Nana shared her first chalk pastel art lessons with her grandchildren around Tricia’s kitchen table. Homeschooling since 2000, Tricia has seen the fruits of home education with three homeschool grads so far! She shares the art and heart of homeschooling at Hodgepodge and is author of the book, Help! I’m Homeschooling! She and her husband, Steve, are also owners of sister sites Homeschool Nature Study and The Curriculum Choice.

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Why Homeschooling Middle School Is Better With Hands-On Learning

When my son was in his elementary years, hands-on learning seemed effortless.

Everywhere I looked, there were cute and fun options for crafts and art projects, all designed to help with learning. I incorporated something multi-sensory learning into almost every aspect of our school day.

It helped him comprehend and retain what we were learning, and it was a lot more fun!

Why Homeschooling Middle School Is Better With Hands-On Learning

As he got older however, and especially as we moved into middle school level learning, our options seemed to dwindle. It was no longer easy to find ways to supplemental hands-on activities for our homeschool.

It was harder to find options for multi-sensory learning, but it was no less important. In fact, my middle schooler needed hands-on activities to thrive.

Why Homeschooling Middle School Is Better With Hands-On Learning

Why Homeschooling Middle School Is Better With Hands-On Learning

Study after study has shown that learners of all ages do best when the material is presented in a multisensory format. Text combined with video, hands-on creative activities, and even art as a way to demonstrate understanding have all been proven to contribute to more successful learner outcomes.

The strategies behind multisensory learning are supported by decades of research, particularly Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. This theory, which was developed by Harvard professor Dr. Howard Gardner, states that the traditional notions of learning and intelligence are too limited. Gardner proposes that people can have proficiencies in different kinds of intelligences, and that teaching students in a way that matches their intellectual strengths can help them grasp tough subjects.

Waterford.Org

So, if the research proves it and we know to it be true in our own homes, why is it so hard to find options for middle school?

I think as we transition kids into more independent learning, the hands-on component tends to get lost. We assume that independent means a textbook, pen and, paper.

But it doesn’t have to be!

Why Homeschooling Middle School Is Better With Hands-On Learning

Middle School Hands-On Learning With You ARE An Artist

Finding You ARE An Artist changed our middle school completely, as it gave me easy resources for hands-on learning across our academic subjects.

For example, when my son was learning about Pompeii in his ancient history study, we created a volcano with Nana. When his seventh grade science book introduced astronomy, we completed You ARE An Artist’s Space Exploration Unit.

We have found lessons for language arts, art history, poetry time, American history, scientific inventions, and so many more, all with our Clubhouse Membership. It completely solved my problem: hands-on learning was back in our middle school!

Adding More Independent Learning To Your Homeschool

As I mentioned, I think one of the reasons options for multisensory learning dissipate in the middle school years is that we expect our children to learn more and more independently.

You ARE An Artist provides an opportunity to practice independent learning as well!

My son completes his lessons without any help or involvement from me. We pick the unit and gather the materials, then I go about my day while Nana takes over as his teacher. (The only thing I sometimes do is create my own version of the activity along side him – not because he needs it, but because I find it to be a wonderful way to connect and create together. )

Homeschooling Middle School With You ARE An Artist

When we were first getting started, I was pleasantly surprised to see that there are so many opportunities for hands-on learning with You ARE An Artist.

Here is just a brief summary of the multisensory lessons available for homeschooling your middle schooler –

Middle School History/Geography

  • American History
  • American Landmarks
  • Ancient History
  • Famous Composers
  • World Maps
  • World Landmarks

Science For Middle School

  • Inventors
  • Moon Missions
  • Solar Eclipse
  • Solar System
  • Space Exploration

Literature And Language Arts

  • Harry Potter (one of my son’s absolute favorites!)
  • Stopping By The Woods – Robert Frost
  • The Hobbit
  • Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre
  • Lamp Post – Narnia C.S. Lewis
  • Hundred Acre Wood – A.A. Milne

Art Lessons For Middle School

  • A Simple Start In Acrylics
  • A Simple Start In Chalk Pastels
  • Art Techniques
  • Famous Artists
  • Art Master Classes

I am so grateful to have found You ARE An Artist. It’s been an integral part of our homeschool throughout my son’s middle school years. He has learned in ways that work best for his interests and needs. He has become a more independent learner. And, he had fun along the way.

What more could I ask for?

Shawna Wingert

Shawna Wingert is a special education teacher turned writer, speaker and consultant. She is also a homeschooling mom of two brilliant boys with differences and special needs.  Shawna has written four books for parents – Everyday Autism, Special Education at Home, Parenting Chaos and her latest, Homeschooling Your Child With Special Needs. She helps parents of children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and special needs every day at DifferentByDesignLearning.com.

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Homeschool Art for Middle and High School – You ARE An Artist

Finding homeschool art programs for middle and high school learning can be difficult.

It certainly was for me and my family.

The options seemed either too formal, or too babyish, for my older learners. But both of my boys have an interest in art and learn best with hands-on, multi-sensory activities. So I continued to search for a solution.

Thankfully, I found You ARE An Artist.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

I wanted options for learning beyond a basic art class. More than that, my youngest son clearly learns best when art is a part of other academic subjects. I was pleased (and a little relieved) to see how many opportunities for older learners are included in the Clubhouse Membership.

You ARE An Artist Courses For Middle and High School Homeschool

This is a small sample of the lessons we’ve done so far that have worked well for both my middle school and high school homeschoolers.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

History and Geography For Older Homeschoolers

  • American History
  • American Landmarks
  • Ancient History
  • Famous Composers
  • World Maps
  • World Landmarks

Science For Middle and High School Homeschoolers

  • Inventors
  • Moon Missions
  • Solar Eclipse
  • Solar System
  • Space Exploration
adding art to literature

Literature and Language Arts For Middle and High School Homeschoolers

Art Classes For Older Learners

How We Incorporate You ARE An Artist Lessons Into Our Middle and High School Learning

There are a couple of ways we have used You ARE An Artist to fuel our upper level learning.

The first is the most obvious, as we use You ARE An Artist for visual art credits in our homeschool. The second has been even more of a support in our homeschool. With these lessons, I have been able to incorporate art into our other areas of study to create a more robust and engaging learning experience.

You ARE An Artist For Homeschool High School Transcripts and Credit Hours

Because art is an elective that both of my boys would choose to take if they attended the school down the street, You ARE An Artist meets all the requirements for this type of credit.

I found this post from Courtney to be really helpful in figuring out what to “count” and how to reflect the learning on my son’s homeschool high school transcript. It outlines exactly how to accurately reflect art credit for high school using You ARE An Artist.

Incorporating Art Into Other Subjects For Middle And High School Learners

When my children were younger, it was a lot easier to find opportunities to weave art into our overall learning. As my boys have grown into middle and high school coursework, this became much more challenging, although no less important!

You ARE An Artist has made it not only possible, but easy for me to plan engaging, age appropriate activities for my older learners.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

For example, my son has an intense interest in the Harry Potter series. Although he has read them before, we decided to incorporate them in to our literature study this year, with a focus on character analysis.

At first glance, it might seem that this would have no real tie to any art, much less specific lessons with You ARE An Artist. But after searching the membership, it became clear that we had more than a few options available.

When my son and I discussed the sorting hat and its role as a lesser identified “character,” he completed a lesson with Nana, drawing the sorting hat and then practicing his handwriting (much needed!) with his favorite sorting hat quote.

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

When the trip from Kings Cross to Hogwarts came up, my son created his own map of Great Britain with Nana as his guide.

  • He drew the map locations himself.
  • Next, he asked me to create the labels for his map (again, handwriting is a concern and he was so proud of his work, he didn’t want to “ruin” it.)
  • Finally, he was able to identify the locations on the map from memory, and point to them for me to label.

This is just a glimpse of why this approach to learning is so effective for children of all ages, even middle and highschoolers!

Homeschool Art for Middle and High School With You ARE An Artist

Time and time again, I am amazed at the benefit of adding art into our other academic subjects. You can see in this example, he not only comprehended the material, he retained it.

It’s what learning with You ARE An Artist is all about!

Shawna Wingert

Shawna Wingert is a special education teacher turned writer, speaker and consultant. She is also a homeschooling mom of two brilliant boys with differences and special needs.  Shawna has written four books for parents – Everyday Autism, Special Education at Home, Parenting Chaos and her latest, Homeschooling Your Child With Special Needs. She helps parents of children with learning differences, behavioral challenges and special needs every day at DifferentByDesignLearning.com.

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This Is How Your Teen Can Earn An Art Credit For Homeschool High School

Art Credit For High School

Are you homeschooling high school? Then as you know, it is a beautiful time to cherish memories made with your teen. You may also be at the point in your homeschool journey where necessary credits are getting completed. High school is the time to make sure that your student’s transcript is coming together nicely for whatever may be in store for them in the future. 

So, if you are in the process of completing high school credits for homeschool, you may need an art credit. Many states require one visual art credit for the completion of high school. If that’s the case for you, we will show you how simple it is to use You Are An Artist to obtain your student’s visual art credit. 

As fellow homeschoolers, we know that homeschool families like to plan their own way! That’s why You Are An Artist is an excellent fit for your visual art credit needs. Our flexible path to a visual art credit with chalk pastels allows you the freedom to plan; however it best suits your student. 

Art Credit For High School

Visual art is not only the process of creating art. The education goes far beyond that. Visual art with chalk pastels also encompasses learning about art history, culture, nature, and more. Luckily, here at ChalkPastel.com, we have over 700 chalk pastel lessons to choose from, including all of those very things!

No searching for the right projects or spending hours trying to map out your visual art curriculum! We have simplified earning an art credit for high school for you. We offer a Visual Art 1 pathway to either a full or half-credit. 

And if you are a homeschool parent, you can appreciate the combination of subjects. It’s a win-win when you can combine art and history, art and geography, and better yet – when you can include multiple students. Yes, you can do that with a Clubhouse Membership

Art Credit For High School

How To Use You Are An Artist For a Visual Arts Homeschool High School Credit

First, check your local requirements to find out how many hours you need for a full or half credit. You will likely find your state requires somewhere between 120-150 hours of study for a full credit and 60-75 hours or a half credit. 

Once you have your requirements handy, you may want to map out your semester or year. An easy way to do that would be with our Visual Art 1 Credit Planner and Tracker. The planner and tracker are also perfect additions to your portfolio if record keeping is required in your state. 

You can plan art lessons to coincide with what you may be learning or books you may be reading this year – with over 600 available lessons to choose from in the Clubhouse Membership, planning out your art credit for high school with chalk pastels is super simple. 

Plus, choosing to pursue a visual art credit is affordable. Unlike many other electives, the supplies for chalk pastel art are minimal. So if your family is watching the budget like many of us are, it’s an economical option that requires few supplies. 

Art Credit For High School

What Can I Count As Visual Art Hours On Our Homeschool Transcript?

What can you count as hours towards your visual art credit? That’s a great question, and accumulating hours is easier than you think! Here are plenty of ideas and ways you can make all of your educational moments count. 

Chalk Pastel Projects: The projects themselves will take time, and the time per project will vary. Each project’s time will be different from student to student, depending on your child’s skill level. However, all of the time spent creating counts! Your teens will likely love this course; chalk pastel art is easy to enjoy.

Art Vocabulary List: Create an art vocabulary list to help your students learn all of the art terms you can find. You could use this list for learning definitions and even test or quiz your student. Another idea may be to have them research particular art terms and the history behind them. Where did the art term originate and when? The possibilities are endless.  

Chalk Techniques Definition List: We have a Chalk Techniques Definition List inside the Clubhouse to help your students get familiar with all chalk techniques. We recommend your student become familiar with this list. Like the vocabulary list above, you could quiz your teen on the list of definitions or do more extensive research on the terms if you choose. 

Field Trips: Yes, of course, field trips count too! And they happen to be a highlight for the whole family to enjoy. Plan a weekly or monthly outing to a nearby art museum, art fair, or art exhibit. Field trips are a fantastic way to experience art in real life. Take a camera to snap photos of your favorites or to try and recreate them later at home with pastels. Have your student bring a journal on the trip and make notes about what they saw. Or bring some chalk pastels along to draw while you are at the museum. You can get extremely creative in using this time for exciting learning opportunities. 

Art History: Watch documentaries about a particular artist or piece of art. Visit the library and check out books that cover art history, culture, and showcase works of art. Your students might veer off onto a rabbit trail as they begin to research the history of pastels themselves. Chalk and oil pastels can be traced back to the renaissance. Yep! The history is fascinating, and some of our most famous artists used chalk pastels. 

Critique Famous Chalk Works: Along with your art history studies, you will find that many famous works of art were created using pastels. Another exciting activity to assign your teen is to critique the pieces. You can dive as deeply into critiquing as you like, but there are some basic questions you can cover. What is the history behind the work? What sort of artwork is it? Ex. Portrait, nature, still life, landscape, abstract, etc. What kind of lines, shapes, and forms do you see? What colors do you see? Discuss space, light vs. dark, and focal points. You can also talk about interpretation; what is the artist trying to convey? Lastly, evaluate. How does the artwork make you feel? Do you like it? Why or why not? 

Submissions: Submissions are another fantastic way to challenge your budding artist and still calculate hours towards your visual art credit. Encourage your student to submit their own works of chalk pastel art into local contests. You can often find competitions to enter posted in your local library or college campuses. A simple Google search will produce all sorts of opportunities where your high school student can enter their art. You might even find fun entry opportunities at your state fair!

Final Project: Assign a final project for each semester or year-end. To determine a final art project, you may want to combine techniques or styles covered over the year. A final art project is a fantastic way to assess everything your teen has learned throughout the curriculum. It is also a fun way for your student to showcase all that he or she has absorbed. 

Coming early 2022! Homeschool High School Art and Music Appreciation

The You ARE an ARTiST Homeschool Fine Arts at Home art and music appreciation plans for the rhetorical stage of education were created to be used by high school students. It is organized in a four year history cycle. Provided in these plans are week by week suggestions for readings in The Annotated Mona Lisa and The Story of Painting. The plan also gives optional assignments for watching The Story of Painting  series.

Earn a homeschool high school fine arts credit with You ARE an ARTiST homeschool fine arts plans for 9th-12th grades!
  • The plan makes use of online sources for viewing artwork for each time period studied. The links are provided to supplement your reading.
  • In addition to reading and viewing the artwork, the student is directed to write a one to two page summary for each time period or topic covered.
  • Spine Texts for all four high school years of the Harmony Fine Arts art appreciation plan are The Annotated Mona Lisa: A Crash Course in Art History From Prehistoric to Post-Modern and Sister Wendy’s The Story of Painting.

You ARE an ARTiST Homeschool Fine Arts music appreciation plans for the high school years are included as part of each high school lesson plan. These music appreciation plans are designed for high school students looking for an organized way to listen to classical music in the four-year cycle of history as outlined in The Well-Trained Mind classical education plan. Each plan gives week by week suggestions for readings in Classical Music Experience, suggestions for listening to related music, and links to additional information about the composers and the time periods under study. In addition to reading and listening, the student is directed to write a one to two page biography for each composer studied and a one to two paragraph opinion of the composer. The student is also asked to keep a list of the musical selections he has listened to during the study period in a notebook.

integrated art

Integrated Art for Homeschooling High School

Are you looking for ways to create a more dynamic learning environment for your high schooler? Homeschooling with an integrated art approach may be exactly what you need! Find out more from Shawna in Integrated Art for Homeschooling High School.

A Complete Visual Art Curriculum For Your High School Homeschool

We hope this helps you easily plan your child’s Visual Art 1 curriculum for the year or semester. Make sure to get a Clubhouse Membership to access your Visual Art 1 Credit Planner and Tracker, along with the Chalk Techniques Definition List. 

We also invite you to join our private group. Inside of the, You ARE An Artist Community, you will find art submission opportunities for your teen along with plenty of art activities that the whole family can enjoy. See you inside!

Courtney is a Jesus-pursuing, native Texan, homeschool mom of three, and she believes homeschooling can be a peaceful and productive rhythm. At Grace, Grow & Edify she helps families create peaceful homeschooling atmospheres through faith, organizational strategies, and cultivating strong roots at home. She is also the founder of Homeschool Mastery Academy.