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13 Colonies Lesson Plans For Creative Kids

Are your students learning about the 13 Colonies? Why not add Nana’s wonderful chalk pastels as a colorful and artistic project to help solidify their knowledge? All you need is a simple starter set of chalk pastels, a pack of construction paper, and Nana’s video art lessons!

13 Colonies Lesson Plans For Creative Kids: Are your students learning about the 13 Colonies? Why not add Nana's wonderful chalk pastels as a colorful and artistic project to help solidify their knowledge? All you need is a simple starter set of chalk pastels, a pack of construction paper, and Nana's video art lessons! #YouAREAnArtist #ThirteenColonies #13Colonies #AmericanHistory #chalkpastels #USHistory

Learning About The 13 Colonies In Your Homeschool

The 13 Colonies are a fascinating part of our nation’s history, and to learn about them, it’s interesting to view them from a geographical and economic standpoint.

The New England colonies included Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire and the Puritans dominated these regions. Their economic activities included shipbuilding, fishing, lumber, animal furs, and whale oil. That’s because these colonies had a cooler climate and rocky soil.

The Middle colonies included New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, and the Quakers dominated these regions. Their economic activities were based on agriculture, including wheat, rye, corn, vegetables, fruits, and livestock. 

The Southern colonies included Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. They were known for their agricultural products, including tobacco, rice, indigo, corn, cotton, and livestock. The Southern colonies had rich fertile soil and a long growing season.

We also enjoyed learning about the founding of each colony.

Did you know that James Oglethorpe founded Georgia in 1732? He wanted to empty the debtor jails in England. Oglethorpe wanted to send all those in England who owed money to Georgia to pay off their debts! He also wanted a buffer between the Spanish in Florida and the English in the Carolinas.

Resources for Learning About Early American History

When studying early American history, we love using:

  • DK Smithsonian: American History Encyclopedia
  • History Year by Year: The History of the World, from the Stone Age to the Digital Age
  • DK Smithsonian: Timelines of Everything

When studying the original 13 Colonies, I also pulled these books from the library:

  • A History of US: Making Thirteen Colonies: 1600-1740
  • You Wouldn’t Want to Be an American Colonist!
  • A History of US: From Colonies to Country: 1735-1791

We also found these online resources fun:

13 Colonies Homeschool Lesson Plans For Creative Kids

Homeschool History Lesson Plans For Creative Kids

Like many children, my son is a hands-on visual learner. He enjoys his studies and retains more knowledge when there are hands-on and creative components to his lessons. That is one of the reasons Nana’s chalk pastel lessons have been a vital and thriving part of our homeschool for many years! Learning about the 13 Colonies was no different. Though we read books and watched documentaries, the hands-on art of Nana’s 13 Colonies chalk pastel lesson solidified his understanding!

13 Colonies Homeschool Lesson Plans For Creative Kids
13 Colonies – the Gathering Storm

Chalk Pastel Resources For Learning About The 13 Colonies

With the You ARE An Artist Clubhouse, you have access to 700+ chalk pastel video art lessons. In addition to the 13 Colonies lesson, did you know that Nana has other Early American history art lessons?

  • Revolutionary War uniforms – Continental soldier and British soldier
  • Boston Tea Party
  • Early colonists
  • White House
  • The Constitution
  • Women in War
  • Paul Revere
  • Lewis and Clark
  • Native Americans – Midwestern Tribes Headdresses
  • Napoleon
  • French Flag
  • War of 1812
  • Columbus
  • Harriet Tubman
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Three Branches of Government
  • Alexander Hamilton
  • King George, III

7 American History Homeschool Lessons Your Kids will Love and Hamilton The Musical Homeschool Study have been among our favorite American History studies thus far. As you can see, my son learns best when we incorporate the hands-on beauty of chalk pastels into our history studies!

13 Colonies Homeschool Lesson Plans For Creative Kids

Additional Homeschool History Lessons For Creative Kids

There are so many excellent chalk pastel history lessons to choose from:

Simply choose the history lessons that best fit the era of history you and your child are studying, and you are on your way to a hands-on and colorful way of experiencing the past.

13 Colonies Homeschool Lesson Plans For Creative Kids

Erin is a writer, blogger, and homeschooler to two intense kids. Her blog is filled with information to help you explore a child led education while making meaningful connections with your children. Discover favorite read alouds, seasonal books, games, art projects, hands-on activities, and learn to just breathe through the ups and downs of life. She loves nature, farm life, good books, knitting, new pens, and hot coffee. Erin is a contributing writer for Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers. Her work has also been featured on Simple Homeschool and Book Shark.

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A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool

You’ll love these ideas for a hands-on Oregon Trail unit study for your kids. Homeschool history is much more enjoyable with books, art, maps, and more!

A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool: You'll love these ideas for a hands-on Oregon Trail unit study for your kids. Homeschool history is much more enjoyable with books, art, maps, and more! #OregonTrail #OregonTrailunitstudy #OregonTraillessons #hands-onOregonTrail #homeschoolhistory #homeschool #chalkpastels #YouAREAnArtist

Oregon Trail Lessons For Your Homeschool

I remember reading about the Oregon Trail’s Great Migration of 1843 in elementary school. The thought of having all of my family’s possessions in a covered wagon for months while we traveled a dangerous path was astounding to me. Imagining myself as a little pioneer girl with none of our modern luxuries was hard to fathom.

Later on, the computer game Oregon Trail came out at school. I can’t even count the times I died of dysentery and cholera, let alone starved to death! It was simply fascinating to me that people intentionally put themselves into these predicaments. Why?

A mighty tempting offer was three hundred sixty acres per family and 160 acres for unmarried settlers in Oregon. The idea and promise of something better drove most people across the western part of the United States. Yet, there is so much more to the Oregon Trail than the pioneers. There are the effects this migration had on the Native Americans, religion, government, and more! 

That’s why it’s an essential part of our nation’s history in westward expansion.

You'll love these ideas for a hands-on Oregon Trail unit study for your kids. Homeschool history is much more enjoyable with books, art, maps, and more!

Apples To Oregon: An Oregon Trail Read Aloud

Our favorite way to learn history is through hands-on activities and rich literature in the forms of picture books, read alouds, and chapter books. To start our study on the Oregon Trail, we chose Apples to Oregon Being The (SLIGHTLY) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (AND CHILDREN) Across the Plains!

A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool

This was a lovely and silly book that both my children enjoyed.

Yes, even my 14-year-old.

*Don’t be afraid to incorporate read alouds and picture books into your older kids’ studies.*

A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool

It helped capture the essence of how a daring little girl named Delicious managed to overcome obstacles that placed her father’s plants in danger during their trip to Oregon.

One such obstacle is the crossing of the Platte River, just as real families did when trekking the Oregon Trail in their covered wagons.

You'll love these ideas for a hands-on Oregon Trail unit study for your kids. Homeschool history is much more enjoyable with books, art, maps, and more!


Hands-On Oregon Trail Art and Geography

We followed Delicious and her family as they traversed the Oregon Trail past Chimney Rock, Courthouse Rock, climbed the Rocky Mountains, and traversed many rivers. Nana’s chalk Pastel Oregon Trail Map helped us to see just how far the family traveled. Plus, chalk pastel maps are so much fun!

My son is a huge fan of Nana’s maps!

Nana provides art and geography lessons with the You ARE An Artist Clubhouse Membership. All you need is a simple set of chalk pastels, a pack of construction paper, and Nana’s video art lessons, and you are well on your way to making your homeschool history fun and hands-on!

A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool

The You ARE An Artist Chalk Pastel Clubhouse is a favorite in our homeschool because we get access to 700+ video art lessons!

A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool

While studying the Oregon Trail, we not only explored Nana’s Oregon Trail Map, but also her Covered Wagon lesson, and the American landmark Multnomah Falls (in Oregon). 

A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool


Additional Homeschool History Resources


There are loads of additional homeschool history resources you can add to your Oregon Trail lessons. We included my son’s The Oregon Trail handheld video game! It’s almost exactly like the one I played as a little girl and such fun!

Other books we’ve included in our study are: 

  • If You Were a Kid on the Oregon Trail 
  • Wagons Ho! 
  • You Wouldn’t Want to be an American Pioneer!
  • Choose Your Own Adventure The Oregon Trail
  • plus a couple of our history encyclopedias to start
A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool

Here are a few other history art lessons we’ve enjoyed with Nana:

There are so many excellent chalk pastel lessons, no matter what part of history you are studying. Nana’s got you covered.

Dive as deeply as you like and follow as many rabbit trails of learning as your kids want by combing great books and chalk pastels art with your next history lesson!

A Hands-On Oregon Trail Unit Study For Your Homeschool

Erin is a writer, blogger, and homeschooler to two intense kids. Her blog is filled with information to help you explore a child led education while making meaningful connections with your children. Discover favorite read alouds, seasonal books, games, art projects, hands-on activities, and learn to just breathe through the ups and downs of life. She loves nature, farm life, good books, knitting, new pens, and hot coffee. Erin is a contributing writer for Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers. Her work has also been featured on Simple Homeschool and Book Shark.